January 2006

UserFriendly on Bill Gates’ obviously wrong claims

two years ago bill gates came up with a proclamation saying that in two years spam will be gone.

we’ve been considering what to write about these claims (now known as wrong, what a shock), for about three weeks now. we ended up deciding the regular press will cover it.

anyway, today on funsec paul ferguson (fergie) saved us the trouble:
http://ars.userfriendly.org/cartoons/?id=20060130

“spam is dead in two years!” was one in a series of such predictions, starting with the classic:
“640k ought to be enough for everybody”
— bill gates, 1981.

bill gates is obviously a genius, but as Sunshine keeps insisting on writing in his blog; prophecy was given to fools. bill gates is no fool and should stay away from such prophecy. it’s obviously not his thing.

bill, you might be an anti-spam kook if…
http://www.rhyolite.com/anti-spam/you-might-be.html

(got anything to tell ren&stimpy? email us: rennstimpy@securiteam.com)

CME-24 (BlackWorm) Users’ FAQ

This FAQ was authored by members of the TISF BlackWorm task force (specifically the MWP / DA groups and the SANS ISC handlers).

The purpose is both to provide with a resource for concerned users and network administrators, as well as to be a level-headed myth-free source on the subject.

There seems to be excessive media hype as well as some “end-of-the-world” type predictions. The end of the world is not coming and most of us will still be here after February 3rd, but this is a serious issue for those who are infected and we didn’t manage to get to.

“300,000 infected users worldwide is not a terribly large amount when compared to previous worms like Sober or Mydoom. However, with this worm it isn’t the quantity of infected users, it is the destructive payload which is most concerning.”
— Joe Stewart, LURHQ.

CME-24 (BlackWorm) Users’ FAQ

Q. What is CME-24?

A. A mass emailing worm with a destructive payload.
Please see
for pointers to antivirus vendor descriptions and analyses relating to
this malware.

Q. I hear about new viruses all the time–what makes this one a “big
deal?”

A. This destructive virus will delete files from a number of popular
programs on February 3rd, and on the 3rd day of the month thereafter.

Files which may be deleted by the malware include files ending with the
extension of DOC, XLS, MDE, MDB, PPT, PPS, RAR, PDF, PSD, DMP, ZIP

Another factor that potentially makes this virus particularly noteworthy
is that it has seen broad distribution, with the estimated infected
machines in the hundreds of thousands.
LURHQ statistics

Another factor that potentially makes this virus noteworthy is it’s self
defense mechanism. It closes windows if the caption has any of the
following strings in it. SYMANTEC, SCAN, KASPERSKY, VIRUS, MCAFEE, TREND
MICRO, NORTON, REMOVAL, or FIX. So many antivirus programs, scanners
etc… can not be updated or used on a system that is infected with
CME-24.

Q. You refer to this virus/worm as CME-24 — that’s not what *my*
antivirus vendor calls it. What other names does CME-24 use?

Vendor            Malware Name

Authentium        W32/Kapser.A@mm
AntiVir           Worm/KillAV.GR
Avast!            Win32:VB-CD [Wrm]
AVG               Worm/Generic.FX
BitDefender       Win32.Worm.P2P.ABM
ClamAV            Worm.VB-8
Command           W32/Kapser.A@mm (exact)
Dr Web            Win32.HLLM.Generic.391
eSafe             Win32.VB.bi
eTrust-INO        Win32/Blackmal.F!Worm
eTrust-VET        Win32/Blackmal.F
Ewido             Worm.VB.bi
F-Prot            W32/Kapser.A@mm (exact)
F-Secure          Email-Worm.Win32.Nyxem.e
Fortinet          W32/Grew.A!wm
Ikarus            Email-Worm.Win32.VB.BI
Kaspersky         Email-Worm.Win32.Nyxem.e
McAfee            W32/MyWife.d@MM
Nod32             Win32/VB.NEI worm
Norman            W32/Small.KI (W32/Small.KI@mm)
Panda             W32/Tearec.A.worm (W32/MyWife.E.Worm)
QuickHeal         I-Worm.Nyxem.e
Sophos            W32/Nyxem-D
Symantec          W32.Blackmal.E@mm
Trend Micro       WORM_GREW.A (Worm_BLUEWORM.E)
VBA32             Email-Worm.Win32.VB.bi
VirusBuster       Worm.P2P.VB.CIL

(source: AV-Test.org)

Q. What is CME?

A. CME provides single, common identifiers to new virus threats to reduce public confusions during malware outbreaks. CME
is not an attempt to solve the challenges involved with naming schemes for viruses and other forms of malware, but instead aims to facilitate the adoption of a shared, neutral indexing capability for malware.

Q. How do people get infected with CME-24?

A. Known methods for infection include infected email attachments and
network shares, however other mechanisms are also possible.

While some areas of the world appear to be more prone toward infection
than others, it appears that infected systems may be found in virtually
all countries.

Q. What should I do to protect myself from getting infected with CME-24?

A. There is a number of things you can do:

Email attachments can contain viruses.

If your Internet Service Provider provides an email scanning service
subscribe to it.

Do not open attachments without first verifying that a trusted sender
intentionally sent it to you by asking them if they sent you an
attachment.

Scan email attachments before opening them.

Do not open emails that claim to have naughty content. This is a common
trick used by email based viruses.

Backup your system!
You should be routinely making backups of your system. If you’ve been
putting it off, do it now. Backups will be a foundation that will help
you recover if your system does get infected. Backups are the most
reliable way to recover your data in the event of any data corruption

event, virus, malware, or hardware failure.
Note that your backup should be taken to non-rewritable media and/or
stored offline. If you do not make your backup to non-rewritable or
offline media, depending on the format you use; your backups might be at
risk from the malware’s destructive payload. This is particularly true
if you currently backup important files into a zipped archive, use
mirrored hard drives, or file shares none of those will protect you from
the destructive potential of this worm.

On new systems create recovery CDs. Many systems sold today do not come
with recovery CDs. The person purchasing the system is expected to
create them. Consult manufactures documentation for details.

Insure that you have antivirus software installed, and that you have
up-to-date antivirus definitions covering this particular malware. Do a
full system scan and confirm that you are not infected with CME-24 or
other malware. If you are infected, seek professional assistance to fix
the problem at once.

Do not unnecessarily share or mount shareable filesystems. Filesystems
should never be made available via weak or non-existant passwords.

Q. Help, I think I have been infected with CME-24. What should I do now?

A. If you have anti-virus software installed verify that it is up to
date. Check with your anti-virus vendor if you are unsure of how to do
this. If you had anti-virus software that you believe was disabled by
CME-24 you may have to uninstall it before re-installing it.

If you do not have anti-virus software installed there are several
anti-virus products that offer free or trial tools.

Av-test.org maintains a list of antivirus products.
http://www.av-test.org/sites/links.php3?lang=en&extra=viren&sort=1
and West Coast labs at
http://www.westcoastlabs.org/cm-av-list.asp?Cat_ID=2
and ICSA
https://www.icsalabs.com/icsa/product.php?tid=dfgdf$gdhkkjk-kkkk.

Some of these vendors offer free online scans as well. Be aware online
scanners usually require activex or java be enabled, may take a long
time and probably require admin privileges. Online scanners also do not
provide any long term protection against reinfection

If you’ve already been infected, you should seek professional help to
deal with that infection at once. Failure to deal with this malware
prior to the 3rd day of the month can result in data loss.

Q. Some very important file was trashed by the worm. I really need to
get the information that was in that file. I don’t have a clean backup.
What can I do? Can I get back at least part of that file?

A. Possibly, some file recovery tools might recover all or part of the
missing data. A data recovery service may be your be able to assist.

Q. Why would someone do something so tremendously stupid and
destructive?

A. Unless the author comes out and tells us we may never know why.

Q. I run Windows Media Center Edition, Mac OS X, Linux, have a Treo,
etc. Is my system at risk? Or is this just a Windows XP thing?

A. This virus only affects Windows operating systems. It affects nearly
every version of windows.

From:
Microsoft’s Security Encyclopedia

Windows NT 3.x/4.0, 95, 2000, XP, Server 2003, ME and 98 are all
potentially affected.

NETWORK ADMINISTRATORS PORTION

Q. I’m a mail server administrator. How can I protect my customers
from CME-24 and other malware?

A. There are several things you may want to do:

You may want to run a server-side antivirus program, or software to
strip or defang potentially dangerous attachments. Under Unix, ClamAV
ClamAV is one example of a free antivirus program that
you can run on your mail server; Procmail Email Sanitizer
Impsec
is an example of a program that you can run to remove or defang
potentially hostile attachments. Under Windows there are several email
scanning antivirus programs available.

You should also endeavor to accept, process and resolve notifications
you may receive about infected customers. Confirm that you have a
working abuse@ address, a working postmaster@ address, and current
whois contact information for your domain(s). See
RFC 2142 for clarification.

If you have netblock(s) that have been assigned to you via SWIP or
whois, or an autonomous system number (ASN), please make sure that you
have current abuse reporting contact information defined in whois for
those resources as well.

If you operate an intrusion detection system, consider running
the Bleeding Snort rules that may help you to identify potentially
infected customers.
Bleeding Snort Rules

Educate your customers about security effective practices.

Site license an antivirus product and distribute it to your customers.

Encourage customers to routinely apply patches.

Encourage customers to use a software and/or hardware firewall.

Encourage customers to routinely backup their systems.

Where terms of service and applicable law permits, scan customer systems
for vulnerabilities and insure that customers get fixed or removed from
the network.

This document was prepared by the TISF BlackWorm task force which
includes many elements in the security communities including: anti spam
groups, CERTs, anti-virus teams, academia, law enforcement, and ISP’s.

The TISF BlackWorm task force would like to thank all the contributors
to this FAQ including: Members of the DA/MWP groups and The Internet
Storm Center handlers.

Original can be found at:
SANS ISC
SecuriTeam Blogs

Winamp 5.12 “play list file” 0day [PATCHED]

a vulnerability for winamp 5.12 was released today (full disclosure mode):
bugtraq

a specially crafted winamp play list file can be used for remote exploitation (i will never understand why such vulnerabilities are called remote).

“the current version of winamp contains an error in its playlist parsing allowing malicious users to execute code via a prepared playlist.”

the poc code suggest using an iframe on a web site linking to the specially crafted file as a possible attack vector.

most people don’t believe a worm is very likely, but i wouldn’t completely rule it out yet.

there are several reasons why a worm potentially could be riskier than the usual mass mailers we see:

1. how many organizations filter email attachments by eliminating known bads rather than allowing known goods? this is a (somewhat) new bad.

2. the social engineering effect should not be dismissed:
– people love clicking.. which we know.
– people get mp3’s in email often or at least not be surprised
when once in a blue moon they do.
– social engineering effect of the above two points is: hey! new
mp3! (i.e. cool mp3/winamp icon).

i wouldn’t rule it out so quickly… although…

some clients won’t show icons… nothing we haven’t seen before with mass mailers and something people may not bother with…

but it is more than a just a possibility and should be taken into account. after all, we have seen what a worm designed only to effect one brand of personal firewall did (witty, anyone?).

winamp vulnerabilities of the past have not been that successful for massive exploitation, though, so in my opinion all bets are still open on this one.

a simple way to avert this until a patch is available would be to remove (or change) the file associations for .pls and .m3u.

update from the winamp development team:
(thank keith!)

yes, we know about it and it’s already been fixed :-)

here is the patched in_mp3.dll for 5.12
http://www.winamp.com/in_mp3.dll

this url will be removed once a new client with this fix has been
released.

(place in_mp3.dll in the winamp\plugins folder)

there’ll be a 5.13 released shortly, which will be exactly the same as
5.12 but with the patched in_mp3 included.

there’ll be a separate patched in_mp3.dll included with the next public
release of 5.2 beta (http://forums.winamp.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=236311), also
hopefully today.

gadi evron,
ge@beyondsecurity.com.

BlackWorm: pcaps

the good guys over at sourcefire who have been helping with the tisf blackworm task force since the beginning released an analysis of blackworm, accompanied by a ton of pcaps. check it out:
http://www.snort.org/rules/advisories/vrt-rules-2006-01-25.html

and the actual analysis and pcaps here:
http://www.snort.org/rules/docs/vrt/nymex/blackworm_analysis.html

gadi evron,
ge@beyondsecurity.com.

UK Home Office Trying To Ban Development Of Hacker/Security Tools.

I’m all for stonger Cyber Laws in the UK, as I am the first to admit that they really are quite lax at the moment, but the proposed new additions to the Police and Justice bill really are taking things too far now.

I’m happy that they plan on extending the maximum prison sentence for hacking into computer systems from 5 to 10 years. The part of the new bill that I have a huge problem with is Clause 35, which contains provisions to stop the development, ownership and distribution of aptly named “hacker tools”.

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