Tips & Tricks

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – example 3 – credit checks

A lot of online security and anti-fraud checklists will tell you to check your credit rating with the credit rating reporting companies.  This is a good idea, and, under certain conditions, you can often get such reports free of charge from the ratings companies.

However, you should never get involved with the promises of credit reports that come via spam.

Oddly, these credit report spam messages have very little content, other than a URL, or possibly a URL and some extra text (which usually doesn’t display) meant only to confuse the matter and get by spam filters.  There are lots of these messages: today I got five in only one of my accounts.

I checked one out, very carefully.  The reason to be careful is that you have no idea what is at the end of that URL.  It could be a sales pitch.  It could be an attempt to defraud you.  It could be “drive-by” malware.  In the case I tested, it redirected through four different sites before finally displaying something.  Those four different sites could simply be there to make it harder to trace the spammers and fraudsters, but more likely they were each trying something: registering the fact that my email address was valid (and that there was a live “sucker” attached to it, worth attempting to defraud), installing malware, checking the software and services installed on my computer, and so forth.

It ended up at a site listing a number of financial services.  The domain was “simply-finances.com.”  One indication that this is fraudulent is that the ownership of this domain name is deeply buried.  It appears to be registered through GoDaddy, which makes it hard to check out with a normal “whois” request: you have to go to GoDaddy themselves to get any information.  Once there you find that it is registered through another company called Domains By Proxy, who exist solely to hide the ownership of domains.  Highly suspicious, and no reputable financial company would operate in such a fashion.

The credit rating link sent me to a domain called “transunion.ca.”  The .ca would indicate that this was for credit reporting in Canada, which makes sense, as that is where I live.  (One of the redirection sites probably figured that out, and passed the information along.)  However, that domain is registered to someone in Chicago.  Therefore, it’s probably fraud: why would someone in Chicago have any insight on contacts for credit reporting for Canadians?

It’s probably fraudulent in any case.  What I landed on was an offer to set me up for a service which, for $17 per month, would generate credit ratings reports.  And, of course, it’s asking for lots of information about me, definitely enough to start identity theft.  There is no way I am signing up for this service.

Again, checking out your own credit rating is probably a good idea, although it has to be done regularly, and it only really detects fraud after the fact.  But going through offers via spam is an incredibly bad idea.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – check your filters

Spam filters are getting pretty good these days.  If they weren’t, we’d be inundated.

But they aren’t perfect.

It’s a good idea to check what is being filtered out, every once in a while, to make sure that you are not missing messages you should be getting.  Lots of things can falsely trigger spam filters these days.

Where and how you check will depend on what you use to read your email.  And how you report that something is or isn’t spam will depend on that, too.

If you use the Web based email systems, like Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook/Hotmail, or others, and you use their Web interface, the spam folder usually is listed with other folders, generally to the left side of the browser window.  And, when you are looking at that list, when you select one of the messages, somewhere on the screen, probably near the top, is a button to report that it isn’t spam.

It’s been a couple of weeks since I did this myself, so I checked two of my Webmail accounts this morning.  Both of them had at least one message caught in the spam trap that should have been sent through.  Spam filtering is good, but it isn’t perfect.  You have to take responsibility for your own safety.  And that means checking the things you use to keep you safe.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 4

Sometimes it’s pretty easy to tell a fraud.  Some of these guys are just lazy:

> From:               “PINILLA, KARINA” <pinillak@friscoisd.org>
> Subject:
> Date sent:          Mon, 2 Dec 2013 22:05:05 +0000

> Do you want your X-mas money and bonus for gift,if Yes contact me at this email:
> david.loanfinancialcomany12@gmail.com

You don’t know this person.  No subject for the message.  No explanation of why they are going to give you money.  (Although the name chosen for the email would seem to indicate that they want to emulate a pay-day loan company–which are pretty much rip-offs anyway.)  Poor grammar and spelling.

A while back someone seriously theorized that this lack of care might be deliberate.  Only stupid people would fall for a “come-on” like this, and it would be easier to defraud stupid people.  Unfortunately, as the song says, the world is full of stupid people …

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – email accounts – example 1

Sometimes phishers are after more than your bank account or credit cards.  These days a lot of them want your email account.  They can use it to send spam, to your friends, and those friends will trust a message from you.  (That’s a more reliable form of social engineering to get them to install malware on their computers.  Or give up their bank accounts and credit card numbers …)

> Dear user
> Your email has exceeded 2 GB, which is created by Webmaster, you are currently
> running at 2.30GB, you can not Send or receive new messages until you check your
> account.Complete the form below to verify your account.

Sometimes the email phishers will send you this “over quota” message.  Other times it may be that you are, supposedly, sending out malware or spam yourself.

> Please complete the details below to confirm your account
>
> (1) E-mail:
> (2) Name:
> (3) Password:
> (4) Confirm Password:

Here they just flat out ask you for your user name and password.

Spam isn’t the only thing they can do with your account.  These days Web based email accounts can be linked to storage space and other functions.  Google accounts are very valuable, since they give the phishers access to Google+ (with lots of personal information about you), YouTube, and Google Drive (which still has Google Docs in it, and can be used to set up phishing Websites).

Again, watch for telltale signs in the headers:

To:                 Recipients <web@epamig.br>
From:               HELP DESK<web@epamig.br>
Date sent:          Sun, 01 Dec 2013 14:01:47 +0100
Send reply to:      647812717@qq.com

It isn’t “to” you, and the “reply” isn’t the same as the “from.”