Tips & Tricks

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – example 3 – credit checks

A lot of online security and anti-fraud checklists will tell you to check your credit rating with the credit rating reporting companies.  This is a good idea, and, under certain conditions, you can often get such reports free of charge from the ratings companies.

However, you should never get involved with the promises of credit reports that come via spam.

Oddly, these credit report spam messages have very little content, other than a URL, or possibly a URL and some extra text (which usually doesn’t display) meant only to confuse the matter and get by spam filters.  There are lots of these messages: today I got five in only one of my accounts.

I checked one out, very carefully.  The reason to be careful is that you have no idea what is at the end of that URL.  It could be a sales pitch.  It could be an attempt to defraud you.  It could be “drive-by” malware.  In the case I tested, it redirected through four different sites before finally displaying something.  Those four different sites could simply be there to make it harder to trace the spammers and fraudsters, but more likely they were each trying something: registering the fact that my email address was valid (and that there was a live “sucker” attached to it, worth attempting to defraud), installing malware, checking the software and services installed on my computer, and so forth.

It ended up at a site listing a number of financial services.  The domain was “simply-finances.com.”  One indication that this is fraudulent is that the ownership of this domain name is deeply buried.  It appears to be registered through GoDaddy, which makes it hard to check out with a normal “whois” request: you have to go to GoDaddy themselves to get any information.  Once there you find that it is registered through another company called Domains By Proxy, who exist solely to hide the ownership of domains.  Highly suspicious, and no reputable financial company would operate in such a fashion.

The credit rating link sent me to a domain called “transunion.ca.”  The .ca would indicate that this was for credit reporting in Canada, which makes sense, as that is where I live.  (One of the redirection sites probably figured that out, and passed the information along.)  However, that domain is registered to someone in Chicago.  Therefore, it’s probably fraud: why would someone in Chicago have any insight on contacts for credit reporting for Canadians?

It’s probably fraudulent in any case.  What I landed on was an offer to set me up for a service which, for $17 per month, would generate credit ratings reports.  And, of course, it’s asking for lots of information about me, definitely enough to start identity theft.  There is no way I am signing up for this service.

Again, checking out your own credit rating is probably a good idea, although it has to be done regularly, and it only really detects fraud after the fact.  But going through offers via spam is an incredibly bad idea.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – check your filters

Spam filters are getting pretty good these days.  If they weren’t, we’d be inundated.

But they aren’t perfect.

It’s a good idea to check what is being filtered out, every once in a while, to make sure that you are not missing messages you should be getting.  Lots of things can falsely trigger spam filters these days.

Where and how you check will depend on what you use to read your email.  And how you report that something is or isn’t spam will depend on that, too.

If you use the Web based email systems, like Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook/Hotmail, or others, and you use their Web interface, the spam folder usually is listed with other folders, generally to the left side of the browser window.  And, when you are looking at that list, when you select one of the messages, somewhere on the screen, probably near the top, is a button to report that it isn’t spam.

It’s been a couple of weeks since I did this myself, so I checked two of my Webmail accounts this morning.  Both of them had at least one message caught in the spam trap that should have been sent through.  Spam filtering is good, but it isn’t perfect.  You have to take responsibility for your own safety.  And that means checking the things you use to keep you safe.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 4

Sometimes it’s pretty easy to tell a fraud.  Some of these guys are just lazy:

> From:               “PINILLA, KARINA” <pinillak@friscoisd.org>
> Subject:
> Date sent:          Mon, 2 Dec 2013 22:05:05 +0000

> Do you want your X-mas money and bonus for gift,if Yes contact me at this email:
> david.loanfinancialcomany12@gmail.com

You don’t know this person.  No subject for the message.  No explanation of why they are going to give you money.  (Although the name chosen for the email would seem to indicate that they want to emulate a pay-day loan company–which are pretty much rip-offs anyway.)  Poor grammar and spelling.

A while back someone seriously theorized that this lack of care might be deliberate.  Only stupid people would fall for a “come-on” like this, and it would be easier to defraud stupid people.  Unfortunately, as the song says, the world is full of stupid people …

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – email accounts – example 1

Sometimes phishers are after more than your bank account or credit cards.  These days a lot of them want your email account.  They can use it to send spam, to your friends, and those friends will trust a message from you.  (That’s a more reliable form of social engineering to get them to install malware on their computers.  Or give up their bank accounts and credit card numbers …)

> Dear user
> Your email has exceeded 2 GB, which is created by Webmaster, you are currently
> running at 2.30GB, you can not Send or receive new messages until you check your
> account.Complete the form below to verify your account.

Sometimes the email phishers will send you this “over quota” message.  Other times it may be that you are, supposedly, sending out malware or spam yourself.

> Please complete the details below to confirm your account
>
> (1) E-mail:
> (2) Name:
> (3) Password:
> (4) Confirm Password:

Here they just flat out ask you for your user name and password.

Spam isn’t the only thing they can do with your account.  These days Web based email accounts can be linked to storage space and other functions.  Google accounts are very valuable, since they give the phishers access to Google+ (with lots of personal information about you), YouTube, and Google Drive (which still has Google Docs in it, and can be used to set up phishing Websites).

Again, watch for telltale signs in the headers:

To:                 Recipients <web@epamig.br>
From:               HELP DESK<web@epamig.br>
Date sent:          Sun, 01 Dec 2013 14:01:47 +0100
Send reply to:      647812717@qq.com

It isn’t “to” you, and the “reply” isn’t the same as the “from.”

CyberSec Tips: E-Commerce – tip details 1 – search engines

Our local paper, like just about everyone else, recently published a set of tips for online shopping.  (They got them from Trend Micro Canada.)  The tips are mostly OK, as far as they go, but I figured they could use a little expansion.

“Don’t rely on search engines to find a shopping site.

“Search results can lead to malicious websites that will take your credit card and other confidential data or infect your computer with a virus. Instead, bookmark reliable online shopping sites.”

As a general rule, it’s best to be careful whenever you go to a site that is new or unknown to you.  However, I’d have to take this tip with a grain of salt.  I did a (Google) search on London Drugs, a chain in Western Canada (widely known in the tech community for their computer departments) (about which I have written before), and the first five pages gave results that were all from, or legitimately about, that company.  Quick checks on other retailers got similar results.

It makes sense to bookmark a “known good” link if you shop someplace regularly.  But if you are going to a new site, you can get into just as much trouble by guessing at a domain name, or even just fumbling typing the URL.  Fraudsters will register a number of domain names that are very similar to those of legitimate companies; just a character or so off; knowing that slipping fingers will drive people to their sites.  Some of those malicious sites look very much like the real thing.  (Others, promoting all kinds of questionable services and deals, are obviously false.)

Always be careful, and suspicious.  If anything seems off, get out of there, and maybe do a bit of research before you try again.  But don’t just avoid search engines as a matter of course.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 3

This one is slightly interesting, in that it contains elements of both 419 and phishing.  It’s primarily an advance fee fraud message.  First off, the headers:

> Subject: Dear Winner!!!
> From: CHELPT <inf8@hotline.onmicrosoft.com>
> Date: Thu, 28 Nov 2013 17:45:06 +0530
> Reply-To: <morrluke@careceo.com>
> Message-ID: <XXX.eurprd01.prod.exchangelabs.com>

Again, we see different domains, in particular, a different address to reply to, as opposed to where it is supposed to be from.

> Corporate Headquarters
> Technical Office Chevrolet promotion unit
> 43/45 The Promenade…
> Head Office Chevrolet motors
> 43/45 The Promenade Cheltenham
> Ref: UK/9420X2/68
> Batch: 074/05/ZY369
> Chevrolet Canter, London, SE1 7NA – United Kingdom

My, my, my.  With all that addressing and reference numbers, it certainly looks official.  But isn’t.

> Dear Winner,
>
> Congratulations, you have just won a cash prize of £1,000, 000, 00. One million
> Great British Pounds Sterling (GBP) in the satellite software email lottery.
> On-line Sweepstakes International program held on this day Satur day 23rd
> November 2013 @05:42.PM London time. Conducted by CHEVROLET LOTTERY BOARD in
> which your e-mail address was pick randomly by software powered by the Internet
> send data’s to;
> ——————————————————————————–
> Tell: +44 701 423 4661             Email: morrluke@careceo.com Officer Name: Mr.
> Morrison Luke. CHEVROLET LOTTERY BOARD London UK
> ——————————————————————————–

As usual, you have supposedly won something.  If you reply, of course, there will start to be fees or taxes that you have to pay before the money is released to you.  The amounts will start out small (hey, who wouldn’t be willing to pay a hundred pound “processing fee” in order to get a million pounds, right?) but then get larger.  (Once you’ve paid something, then you would tend to be willing to pay more.  Protecting your investment, as it were.)  And, of course you will never see a cent of your winnings, inheritance, charity fund, etc, etc.

> Below is the claims and verifications form. You are expected to fill and return
> it immediately so we can start processing your claims:
>
> 1. Full Names:
> 2. Residential Address:
> 3. Direct Phone No:
> 4. Fax Number
> 5. Occupation:
> 6. Sex:
> 7. Age:
> 8. Nationality:
> 9. Annual Income:
> 10. Won Before:
> 11. Batch number: CHELPT1611201310542PM
> 12: Ticket Numbers: 69475600545-72113
> 13: Lucky numbers: 31-6-26-13-35-7

But here, they are starting to ask you for a lot of personal information.  This could be used for identity theft.  Ultimately, they might ask for your bank account information, in order to transfer your winnings.  Given enough other data on you, they could then empty your account.

> We wish you the best of luck as you spend your good fortune thank you for being
> part of our commemorative yearly Draws.
>
> Sincerely,
> Mrs. Susan Chris.
> CHEVROLET LOTTERY PROMOTION TEAM.

Oh, yeah.  Good luck on ever getting any of this money.

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – example 2

Some of you may have a BarclayCard credit card.  You might receive a reminder message that looks like the one below.  (Actually, the only credit card company I know that actually sends email reminders is American Express, which I think is a black mark on their security record.)

> Subject: Barclaycard Payment is due
> From: “Barclaycard” <barclaycard@card.com>
> Received: from smtp.alltele.net

If you look at the message headers, you might note that this message doesn’t come from where it says it comes from, and that’s something of which to beware.

> Your barclaycard payment is due
>
> Visit your card service section below to proceed
> hxxp://www.equivalente.it/rss/re.html

You might also note that, it you do have a BarclayCard, it’s probably because you live in the UK.  And the server they want you to visit is in Italy: .it

CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 2

Another advance fee/419 fraud is the lottery.

> Subject: Dear User
> To: Recipients <info@notizia348.onmicrosoft.com>
> From: Alexander brown <info@notizia348.onmicrosoft.com>

Again, your email address, which supposedly “won” this lottery, is missing: this message is being sent to many people.  (If you really had won millions, don’t you think they’d take a bit more care getting it to you?)

> Dear Internet User,
>  We are pleased to inform you again of the result of the Internet Promotional
>  Draws. All email addresses entered for this promotional draws were randomly
>  inputted from an internet resource database using the Synchronized
> Data Collective Balloting Program.

Sounds impressive.  But it really doesn’t mean anything.  In the first place, you never entered.  And why would anyone set up a lottery based simply on random email sent around the net?  There is no benefit to anyone in that, not even as a promotion.

>  This is our second letter to you. After this automated computer ballot,your
>  email address was selected in Category A with Ref Number: GTL03-2013 and
>  E-Ticket Number: EUB/8974IT,this qualifies you to be the recipient of t
> he grand prize award sum of (US$2,500,000.00) Two Million, Five Hundred Thousand
> United States Dollars.

This is interesting: it presents still more impressive stuff–that really has no meaning.  It starts by saying this is the second message to you, implying that you missed the first.  This is intended to make you anxious, and probably a bit less questioning about things.  Watch out for anything that tries to rush or push you.

The numbers, of course, are meant to sound official, but are meaningless.

>  The payout of this cash prize to you will be subject to the final validations
>  and satisfactory report that you are the bona fide owner of the winning email
>  address. In line with the governing rules of claim, you are requ
> ired to establish contact with your designated claims agent via email or
> telephone with the particulars below:
>  Enquiry Officer: Mr. Samuel Trotti
> Phone: +39 3888146161
> Email: trottioffice@aim.com

Again, note that the person you are to contact is not the one (or even the same domain) as sent the message.

>  You may establish contact with the Enquiry Officer via the e-mail address above
>  with the information’s necessary: Name:, Address:, Phone:, Cell Phone:, Email:,
>  Alternative Email:, Occupation:, Ref Number and E-Ticket Number. All winnings
>  must be claimed within 14 days from today. After this date all unclaimed funds
>  would be included in the next stake. Remember to quote your reference
>  information in all correspondence with your claims agent.

This is interesting: the amount of information they ask from you means that this might not simply be advance fee fraud, but they might be doing phishing and identity theft, as well.