Trust me, I didn’t look right as I typed this …

‘Lying eyes’ are a myth – looking to the right DOESN’T mean you are fibbing.

“Many psychologists believe that when a person looks up to their right they are
likely to be telling a lie.  Glancing up to the left, on the other hand, is said to
indicate honesty.

“Co-author Dr Caroline Watt, from the University of Edinburgh, said: ‘A large
percentage of the public believes that certain eye movements are a sign of lying,
and this idea is even taught in organisational training courses. … The claimed link
between lying and eye movements is a key element of neuro-linguistic
programming.

“According to the theory, when right-handed people look up to their right they
are likely to be visualising a ‘constructed’ or imagined event.  In contrast when
they look to their left they are likely to be visualising a ‘remembered’ memory.
For this reason, when liars are constructing their own version of the truth, they
tend to look to the right.”

“Psychologist Prof Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, said: ‘The
results of the first study revealed no relationship between lying and eye
movements, and the second showed that telling people about the claims made by
NLP practitioners did not improve their lie detection skills.’

However, this study raises a much more serious question.  These types of “skills” are being extensively taught (and sought) by law enforcement and other agencies.  How many investigations are being misdirected and delayed by false suppositions based on NLP “techniques”?  More disturbingly, how many people are being falsely accused, dismissed, or charged due to the same questionable “information”?  (As I keep telling my seminars, when you get sidetracked into pursuing the wrong suspect, the real culprit is getting away free.)

(I guess we’ll have to stop watching “The Mentalist” now …)

Quick way to find out if your account has been hacked?

In the wake of the recent account “hacks,” and fueled by the Yahoo (and, this morning, Android) breaches, An outfit called Avalanche (which seems to have ties to, or be the parent company of, the AVG antivirus) has launched https://shouldichangemypassword.com/

They are getting lots of press.

“If you don’t know, a website called ShouldIChangeMyPassword.com will
tell you. Just enter your email—they won’t store your address unless
you ask them to—and click the button that says, “Check it.” If your
email has been associated with any of a large and ever-growing list
of known password breaches, including the latest Yahoo hack, the
site will let you know, and advise you to change it right away.”

Well, I tried it out, with an account that gets lots of spam anyway.  Lo and behold, that account was hacked!  Well, maybe.

(I should point out that, possibly given the popularity of the site, it is pig slow at the moment.)

The address I used is one I tend to give to sites, like recruiters and “register to get our free [fillintheblank]” outfits, that demand one.  It is for a local community site that used to be a “Free-net.”  I use a standard, low value password for registering on remote sites since I probably won’t be revisiting that site.  So I wasn’t completely surprised to see the address had been hacked.  I do get email through it, but, as noted, I also get (and analyse) a lot of spam.

When you get the notification, it tells you almost nothing.  Only that your account has been hacked, and when.  However, you can find a list of breaches, if you dig around on the site.  This list has dates.  The only breach that corresponded to the date I was given was the Strategic Forecasting breach.

I have, in the past, subscribed to Stratetgic Forecasting.  But only on the free list.  (Nothing on the free list ever convinced me that the paid version was worth it.)  So, my email address was listed in the Strategic Forecasting list.  But only my email address.  It never had a password or credit card number associated with it.

It may be worth it as a quick check.  However, there are obviously going to be so many false positives (like mine) and false negatives (LinkedIn isn’t in the list) that it is hard to say what the value is.

Apple and “identity pollution”

Apple has obtained a patent for “identity pollution,” according to the Atlantic.

I am of not just two, but a great many minds about this.  (OK, admit it: you always knew I was schizophrenic.)

First off, I wonder how in the world they got a patent for this.  OK, maybe there isn’t much in the way of prior art, but the idea can’t possibly be called “non-obvious.”  Even before the rise of “social networking” I was prompting friends to use my “loyalty” shopping cards, even the ones that just gave discounts and didn’t get you points.  I have no idea what those stores think I buy, and I don’t much care, but I do know that they have very little about my actual shopping patterns.

In our advice to the general population in regard to Internet and online safety in general, we have frequently suggested a) don’t say too much about yourself, and b) lie.  Isn’t this (the lying part) exactly what Apple is doing?

In similar fashion, I have created numerous socmed accounts which I never intended to use.  A number of them are simply unpopulated, but some contain false information.  I haven’t yet gone to the point of automating the process, but many others have.  So, yet another example of the US patent office being asleep (Rip-Van-Winkle-level asleep) at the technological switch.

Then there is the utility of the process.  Yes, OK, we can see that this might (we’ll come back to the “might”) help protect your confidentiality.  How can people find the “you” in all the garbage?  But what is true for advertisers, spammers, phishers, and APTers is also true for your friends.  How will the people who you actually *want* to find you, find the true you among all the false positives?

(Here is yet another example of the thre “legs” of the security triad fighting with each other.  We have endless examples of confidentiality and availability working against each other: now we have confidentiality and integrity at war.  How do you feel, in general, about Apple recommending that we creating even more garbage on the Internet than is already there?)

(Or is the fact that it is Apple that is doing this somehow appropriate?)

OK, then, will this work?  Can you protect the confidentiality of your real information with automated false information?  I can see this becoming yet another spam/anti-spam, CAPTCHA/CAPTCHA recognition, virus/anti-virus arms race.  An automated process will have identifiable signs, and those will be detected and used to ferret out the trash.  And then the “identity pollution” (a new kind of “IP”?) will be modified, and then the detection will be modified …

In th meantime, masses of bandwidth and storage will be consumed.  Socnet sites will be filled with meaningless accounts.  Users of socmed sites will be forced to spend even more time winnowing out those accounts not worth following.  Socnet companies will be forced to spend more on storage and determination of false accounts.  Also, their revenues will be cut as advertises realize that “targetted” ads will be less targetted.

Of course, Apple will be free to create a social networking site.  They already have created pieces of such.  And Apple can guarantee that Apple product users can use the site without impedance of identity pollution.  And, since Apple owns the patent, nobody else will be able to pollute identities on the Apple socnet site.

(And if Apple believes that, I have a bridge to sell them …)

LinkeDin!

No!  I’m *not* asking for validation to join a security group on LinkedIn!

Apparently several million passwords have been leaked in an unsalted file, and multiple entities are working on cracking them, even as we speak.  (Type?)

So, odds are “low but significant” that your LinkedIn account password may have been cracked.  (Assuming you have a LinkedIn account.)  So you’d better change it.

And you might think about changing the password on any other accounts you have that use the same password.  (But you’re all security people, right?  You’d *never* use the same password on multiple accounts …)