Physical Security

Fences, alarms, but also TEMPEST and side channels

Disasters in BC

The auditor general has weighed in, and, surprise, surprise, we are not ready for an earthquake.

On the one hand, I’m not entirely sure that the auditor general completely understands disaster planning, and she hasn’t read Kenneth Myers and so doesn’t know that it can be counter-productive to produce plans for every single possibility.

On the other hand, I’m definitely with Vaugh Palmer in that we definitely need more public education.  We are seeing money diverted from disaster planning to other areas, regardless of a supposed five-fold increase in emergency budget.  In the past five years, the professional association has been defunded, training is very limited in local municipalities, and even recruitment and “thank you” events for volunteers have almost disappeared.  Emergency planning funds shouldn’t be used to pay for capital projects.

(And the province should have been prepared for an audit in this area, since they got a warning shot last year.)

So, once again, and even more importantly, I’d recommend you all get emergency training.  I’ve said it beforeI keep saying itI will keep on saying it.

(Stephen Hume agrees with me, although he doesn’t know the half of it. )

Access vulnerability on Android tablet

I made my first ever “Black Friday” purchase last week.  Staples (for those outside North America, this is a “big box” office supplies store with a large computer and tech section) had a door-crasher special of a Digital2 brand 7″ tablet, running Android 4.1, marked down from $250 to $70.  We had to go past a Staples on an errand, so I stopped in and got it.

I don’t quite regret getting it: particular at that price it is probably worth it.  I may do a review of its shortcomings at some point.  (Low memory, poor storage management, slow performance, limited battery, incompatible with some apps, poor file management options, many functions irregular.)  However, I came across something this morning that indicates a weakness.

One of the oddities is that there is no indication of charging or battery unless the tablet is on.  So, while charging, I had the tablet on to check the battery level.  The indicator icons are on the lower right of the screen on this model, and, in order to get more details on the charge, I touched that area.  But I had forgotten to unlock the device.

Lo and behold, it brought up the quick indicator list anyway, and, along with it, the notifications.  Prodding at this, I found that I couldn’t get into the settings menu proper, but I could access any of the notification messages.  And, once into any of those apps I had full access.

(This sounds similar to a number of lock-screen vulnerabilities that I’ve heard of on various Android and iOS versions and devices, but it seemed to be simpler and more direct than most.)

Firewalled

Full details are not out yet, but there was a “police incident” today in NorthVancouver, which resulted in the closure of two bridges from the North Shore.

(No, the cops aren’t looking for me.  Although this is fairly near our home, and only a few blocks up the street from where embroidery and quilting guilds meet.)

If you look at the map, you will see that a) the bridges aren’t that close to each other, and b) the incident was close to neither.

By closing both bridges, the police can completely isolate the North Shore from the rest of the world.  (I assume they put checks out at the Seabus and the road up to Squamish, although whoever they were looking for would have to be pretty stupid to head that way.)  Also, by closing the bridges, the police have probably tied up all traffic everywhere on the North Shore as well, preventing the perp from going very far in any case  :-)

Although we don’t know what happened, IHT indicates a homicide, and the response indicates someone may have been kidnapped, as well.

Risk analysis, traffic analysis, and unusual factors

Canadian terrorists strike again: apparently we are responsible for taking down a major piece of transportation infrastructure, vis, the I-5 bridge over the Skagit river at Mount Vernon.

A friend in Seattle assures me that, while he is disappointed in us, he holds no grudges, and is willing to warn us if he hears of any drone strikes planned for north of the border.

(Allow me, for a moment, to examine this “oversized load” on which everyone is blaming the collapse.  Image 2 in the slide deck [if they don’t change it] is this “oversized load.”  You will notice that it is basically an empty box with the two sides missing, and has, relatively, zero structural rigidity.  If a ding from that kind of load brought the bridge down [and didn’t even collapse the load itself], the bridge was definitely unsafe.)

I drive that route regularly, and, when I heard that a bridge had gone down, that bridge was the first one I thought of.  I have always felt unsafe crossing it.  There is a wrongness about it you can just feel.

It’s also ugly.  And I am reminded of an essay by an engineer who said that bridges were the most beautiful products of all forms of engineering.  A properly designed bridge has curves, and those curves just feel right.  They are beautiful.

So, if you ever have questions about a bridge, and you don’t have enough facts to go on, just look at it.

If it’s ugly, don’t cross it.