Networking

Review of “cloud drives” – Younited – pt 2

My major test of the Younited drive took a few days, but it finally seems to have completed.  In a less than satisfactory manner.

I “synched” a directory on my machine with the Younited drive.  As noted, the synching ran for at least two days.  (My mail and Web access was noticeably slow during that time.)  The original directory, with subdirectories, contained slightly under 7 Gigs of material (the quota for basic Younited drives is said to be 10 G) in slightly under 2,800 files.  The transfer progress now shows 5,899 files transferred, and I’m out of space.

A quick check shows that not all files are on the Younited drive.

Review of “cloud drives” – Younited – pt 1

I’m trying out various “cloud drives”–or “file transmission services” as my little brother likes to call them, so as not to sully the name of cloud storage–and thought I’d mention a few things about F-Secure’s Younited first.

The reasons it is first are because a) F-Secure is a highly respected antivirus firm and based beyond the reach of the NSA in Finland, b) they are promoting the heck out of the new service by making it practically invitation only and asking that people tweet and blog about it, and c) it is really starting to annoy me.

Supposedly you can access it via the Web or through apps you install on your computer or device.  I have been able to upload a few individual files onto it, and access them on other devices.  Except for the MacBook.  The app seemed to install fine, but then it wouldn’t open anymore.  On the theory that, like SkyDrive, it wouldn’t install on my copy of Snow Leopard (and at least SkyDrive had the decency to tell me that), I upgraded to Maverick (which has created its own problems).  That hasn’t fixed it.  Next step is probably to throw it in the trash and reinstall.

I decided to give it a bit of an acid test tonight, and upload a set of directories.  First off, it seemed to load everything, willy-nilly, into a standard set of folders for “Pictures,” “Videos,” “Music,” etc, regardless of the directories they came from.  At least, that what the app showed.  The Web browser, if you accidentally hit the right button (and I’m darned if I can find out how to get it back) showed the directories–but they were all empty.  A web browser on another machine shows nothing at all.

(A gauge of progress for uploads has been saying “Transferring 635/6475″ for the last several hours, regardless of what else has gone on.)

I thought maybe I might have to create and populate a directory at a time.  That’s when I realized that I can’t make directories.  If you get past the initial level of “Help” FAQs (which don’t have a lot of helpful detail) you can find the “community.”  Do a search on “folders,” and a number of listings come up, included an article on how to organize your files.  This says that, in order

“To create a folder

  1. Go to the younited_folder.PNG younited folder.
  2. Select Create_folder.PNG Create folder.
  3. Type a name for the older and select OK.”

Only problem is, when you click on the younited icon, the “create folder” option or icon never appears.  Other entries are equally “helpful.”  (What is the icon for sarcasm?)

I will, undoubtedly, learn more about the system and how to use it, but, at the moment, it is frustrating in the extreme.

A virus too big to fail?

Once upon a time, many years ago, a school refused to take my advice (mediated through my brother) as to what to do about a very simple computer virus infection.  The infection in question was Stoned, which was a boot sector infector.   BSIs generally do not affect data, and (and this is the important point) are not eliminated by deleting files on the computer, and often not even by reformatting the hard disk.  (At the time there were at least a dozen simple utilities for removing Stoned, most of them free.)

The school decided to cleanse it’s entire computer network by boxing it up, shipping it back to the store, and having the store reformat everything.  Which the store did.  The school lost it’s entire database of student records, and all databases for the library.  Everything had to be re-entered.  By hand.

I’ve always thought this was the height of computer virus stupidity, and that the days when anyone would be so foolish were long gone.

I was wrong.  On both counts.

“In December 2011 the Economic Development Administration (an agency under the US Department of Commerce) was notified by the Department of Homeland Security that it had a malware infection spreading around its network.

“They isolated their department’s hardware from other government networks, cut off employee email, hired an outside security contractor, and started systematically destroying $170,000 worth of computers, cameras, mice, etc.”

The only reason they *stopped* destroying computer equipment and devices was because they ran out of money.  For the destruction process.

Malware is my field, and so I often sound like a bit of a nut, pointing out issues that most people consider minor.  However, malware, while now recognized as a threat, is a field that extremely few people, even in the information security field, study in any depth.  Most general security texts (and, believe me, I know almost all of them) touch on it only tangentially, and often provide advice that is long out of date.

With that sort of background, I can, unfortunately, see this sort of thing happening again.

 

Lest you think I exaggerate any of this, you can read the actual report.

Fuzzing Samsung Kies

Android fuzzing is always fun – seems that whenever we fuzz an android app it crashes within seconds.

Samsung Kies was no different. With the help of the talented Juan Yacubian (who built the Kies module in no time) we launched beSTORM against Kies… And saw it crash in record 23 seconds (just over 1,100 attack combinations).

Next on the agenda: install gdb for Android and build the proper payload.

Samsung Kies Crash