malware

Blatant much?

So a friend of mine posts (on Twitter) a great shot of a clueless phishing spammer:

So I reply:
@crankypotato Were only all such phishing spammers so clueless. (Were only all users clueful enough to notice …)

So some other scammer tries it out on me:
Max Dubberly  @Maxt4dxsviida
@rslade http://t.co/(dangerous URL that I’m not going to include, obviously)

I don’t know exactly where that URL redirects, but when I tried it, in a safe browser, Avast immediately objected …

Not the bad news you thought you were reporting …

“The 2012 Norton Cybercrime Report, released Wednesday, says more than 46 per cent of Canadians have reported attempts by hackers to try to obtain personal data over the past 12 months,” according to the Vancouver Sun.

Well, since I see phishing every single day, and malware a few times times per week, what this survey is *really* saying is that 54% of Canadians don’t know what phishing and malware looks like.

(And you others don’t need to gloat: apparently the same figure holds globally …)

Kinda depressing …

SMS Apple (malware) spam on Bell Mobility (Canada)

SMS spam on Bell seems to have suddenly jumped.  On Tuesday, both Gloria and I got spam saying we had won something from Apple.  Today, we both got similar spam.

Today’s message came “from” 240-393-8527.  It asked us to visit hxxp://www.apple.com.ca.llhf.net [1]

Neither F-Secure nor VirusTotal had anything to say about it, but it is safe to assume that the site is dangerous.  Avast now blocks it.

In trying to contact Bell about this, I noted that Bell’s Website “contact” page lists a “Chat with us” function that simply does nothing if agents are busy, and no means of contacing Bell via email.  “How to escalate a complaint” returns the same page, with the same lack of response from the agent button.  When I finally did reach an agent, “he” was pretty clueless about the whole situation.  I strongly suspected “he” was a rather simplistic program.

Having Given the agent the information above, his response was to ask “Samuel: I understand. Have you registered under apple newsletter list?”  He then asked for my name and phone number (which I had previously given him at the beginning of the session), and then told me “Samuel: I unfortunately cannot unsubscribe that spam for you from here as I see in your account.”  He offered to cut the SMS/texting function on my account.

That’s it.  That’s the only solution.  Bell doesn’t have any spam filtering on SMS, even when the spam is as obvious, egregious, and malicious as this one.  (Yes, they do have a spam filtering option, if you want to pay them an extra $5 per month.  Given the quality of support, I think I’ll give that a miss.)

[1] Note that this isn’t apple.com, the trailing “domains” override that.  This domain is listed to:

Domain Name ………………… llhf.net
Name Server ………………… ns5.myhostadmin.net
ns6.myhostadmin.net
Registrant Name …………….. jun wang
Registrant Organization ……… wang jun
Registrant Address ………….. shang hai shi xu hui qu
Registrant City …………….. shang hai
Registrant Province/State ……. SH
Registrant Postal Code ………. 200087
Registrant Country Code ……… cn
Registrant Phone Number ……… 02178861511
Registrant Fax ……………… 02178861511
Registrant Email ……………. yaobing349@hotmail.com

Sophos Threatsaurus

http://www.sophos.com/en-us/security-news-trends/security-trends/threatsaurus.aspx

Concentrating on malware and phishing, this is a very decent guide for “average” computer users with little or no security background or knowledge.  Three sections in a kind of dictionary or encyclopedia format: malware and threats, protection technologies, and a (very brief but still useful) history of malware (1949-2012).

Available free for download, and (unlike a great many “free” downloads I could name) you don’t even have to register for endless spam from the company.

Recommended to pass around to family, friends, and your corporate security awareness department.