Fuzzing

About the reported beSTORM “Vulnerability”

A few people asked me about the advisory posted on exploit db (Now also on SecurityFocus) that talks about a security vulnerability in beSTORM, which would be ironic since it’s a fairly simple vulnerability to find by fuzzing, and beSTORM is, after all, a fuzzer.

I always thought security holes in security products were especially funny. You expect security companies to know better, right? Well, as usual, it’s much less funny when it happens to you. Seeing reports about a vulnerability in beSTORM wasn’t amusing.

The thing is, the vulnerability is not in beSTORM, it is not remote, and on top of all – the exploit PoC does not work as advertised. Now comes the second irony: I’ve been on the management team of a security database for the past 14 years, and I’m sure more than one vendor cursed me to walk a mile in their shoes. Well, vendors: I am! Trying to explain to vulnerability databases that just because someone posted something doesn’t mean it’s true, is not easy. But you knew that already.

Now for the details:

The vulnerability described is a problem in¬†WizGraphviz.dll, a graphic library that has been abandoned by its developer. It is not a part of beSTORM, and never was. You could, in early versions of beSTORM, install that DLL in order to view SVG files. beSTORM would have downloaded it on request. But it hasn’t been the case in a while now.

The vulnerability is also not remote. This ActiveX is marked not safe for scripting, which means you have to manually enable it to get the exploit code to run.

In other words, you need to download an ActiveX from the Internet, go into the settings to mark it safe for scripting (and ignore the huge warnings) and then you will be vulnerable to an ActiveX attack when visiting a rogue site. And all this is only true for an old version of beSTORM which is no longer available for download.

Life is full of ironies: This attack is simple enough that we could (should?) have found it by fuzzing this DLL ourselves. Hell, there’s a good chance the good guys that published this advisory did exactly that. For being lazy, we deserve the public flogging. But just to set the record straight, a security vulnerability it ain’t.

 

 

 

Who’s behind Stuxnet?

Stuxnet is a worm that focuses on attacking SCADA devices. This is interesting on several levels.

First, we get to see all of those so-called isolated networks get infected, and wonder how that happened (here’s a clue: in 2010, isolated means in a concrete box buried underground with no person having access to it).

Then, we get to see how weak SCADA devices really are. No surprise to anyone who has ever fuzzed one.

After that, we get to theorize on who’s behind it and who is the target. What’s your guess?

Apple iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad Security Update

Yesterday Apple released a security update that patches the Jailbreakme vulnerabilities to stop people Jailbreaking their Apple devices.

Okay, so maybe I’m looking at this the wrong way around, but it seems that when a vulnerability gets a lot of media attention, Apple work the backsides off to get this one patched. I understand that we are talking serious vulnerabilities here, but still. I’ve personally been in contact with Apple for a couple of months now in regards to a DoS vulnerability that I discovered, and still have no time line on when a patch for this will be released, so maybe all that’s needed is to turn this into some media hype, hmmm.

So the vulnerabilities that this patches are the following:

  • FreeTypeCVE-ID: CVE-2010-1797

    Available for: iOS 2.0 through 4.0.1 for iPhone 3G and later, iOS 2.1 through 4.0 for iPod touch (2nd generation) and later

    Impact: Viewing a PDF document with maliciously crafted embedded fonts may allow arbitrary code execution

    Description: A stack buffer overflow exists in FreeType’s handling of CFF opcodes. Viewing a PDF document with maliciously crafted embedded fonts may allow arbitrary code execution. This issue is addressed through improved bounds checking.

  • IOSurfaceCVE-ID: CVE-2010-2973

    Available for: iOS 2.0 through 4.0.1 for iPhone 3G and later, iOS 2.1 through 4.0 for iPod touch (2nd generation) and later

    Impact: Malicious code running as the user may gain system privileges

    Description: An integer overflow exists in the handling of IOSurface properties, which may allow malicious code running as the user to gain system privileges. This issue is addressed through improved bounds checking.

Where To Sell Software Vulnerabilities/Exploits?

So the last post that I wrote, and Aviram’s follow on post really got me thinking, unless you know where to sell software vulnerabilities or exploits, finding places isn’t really that easy at all. I knew about ZDI and VPC, but that was it really, and it took me ages to remember VPC.

So I spent some time Googling, and well that didn’t help me much to me honest. So I’ve decided to compile a list on here, with a subject that’s easy enough to search for.

So what I’m asking all our readers is that if you know of anywhere that buys software vulnerabilities legitimately, please let me know by leaving a comment and I’ll update the list here accordingly.

So without any further ado, here’s the definitive list of where you can sell those exploits and vulnerabilities that you worked so hard on discovering and writing.

Beyond Security

Zero Day Initiative (Tippingpoint)

Vulnerability Contributor Program (iDefense)

Global Vulnerability Partnership