DDoS

S. Korea Cyber Attack Crashes Navigation Devices. Time to fuzz your GPS?

South Korea suffered a major cyber attack yesterday. The origin of the attack seems to be China at the moment, but that is far from being definite.

I happened to be in one of the (several) cyber security operation centers, by pure coincidence. I had a chance to see events unravel in real time. Several banks have been hit (including the very large shinhan bank) and a few broadcasting channels.

The damage is hard to assess, since it’s now in everyone’s advantage to blame the cyber attack on anything from a system crash to the coffee machine running out of capsules. Budget and political moves will dominate most of the data that will be released in the next few days.
It’s clear, however, that the damage substantial. I reached out to a few friends in technical positions at various MSPs and most had a sleepless night. They’ve been hit hard.

The most interesting part of this incident, in my opinion, was a report on car GPS crashing while the attack was taking place. I haven’t seen a news report about that yet, and I couldn’t personally verify it (as I mentioned, I was stationary at the time, watching the frantic cyber-security team getting a handle on a difficult situation) but this is making rounds in security forums and a couple of friends confirmed to me that their car navigation system crashed and had to be restarted, at the exact time the attack was taking place.

The most likely explanation is that the broadcasting companies, who send TPEG data to the GPS devices (almost every car in Korea has a GPS device, almost all get real-time updates via TPEG), had sent malformed data which caused the devices to crash. This data could have been just a result of a domino effect from the networks crashing, or it could have been a very sophisticated proof-of-concept by the attacker to see if they can create a distruption. Traffic in Seoul is bad even on a normal day; without GPS devices it can be a nightmare.

Which brings up an interesting point about fuzzing network devices. TPEG fuzzers have been available for a while now (beSTORM has a TPEG module, and you can easily write your own TPEG fuzzer). The difficult part is getting the GPS device to communicate with the fuzzing generator; this is something the GPS developer can do (but probably won’t) but it is also possible for a government entity to do the necessary configuration to make that happen, given the proper resources or simply by forcing the vendors to cooperate.

The choice of the attacker to bring down the broadcasting networks might be deliberate: other than knocking TV and radio off the air (an obvious advantage in a pre-attack strike) the broadcasting networks control many devices who rely on their data. Forcing them to send malformed data to crash a variety of devices can have interesting implications. If I was a little more naive, I would predict that this will push governments around the world to focus more on fuzzing to discover these kind of vulnerabilities before they see their adversaries exploit them. But in the world we live in, they will instead throw around the phrase “APT” and buy more “APT detection products” (an oximoron if I’ve ever heard one). Thank god for APT, the greatest job saving invention since bloodletting.

An detailed analysis of the attack here:
http://training.nshc.net/KOR/Document/virus/20130321_320CyberTerrorIncidentResponseReportbyRedAlert(EN).pdf

The political risks of a DDoS

In Korea, the ruling party performed a DDoS attack, and as result the chairman and most of its officials will resign. Most likely, it will be disbanded completely.
This is probably the most severe result of a cyber attack yet. Of course, the only reason they know who to blame, is because the guy responsible for the attack admitted guilt. DDoS is all fun and games until the guy you hired to do it spills the beans.

Get trained for emergencies

I’ve mentioned this before.

We seem to have had a number of disasters this year: earthquakes, tsunami, a few hurricanes (with one currently sweeping Japan, and another building right now off the east coast of the US), wildfires, you name it.  In the US, this is National Preparedness Month.

So this is a good time to get trained.  It gets you CPEs, usually for free.

And, in a disaster, it makes you part of the solution, not part of the problem.

“Extrusion Detection”, Richard Bejtlich

BKEXTDET.RVW   20101023

“Extrusion Detection”, Richard Bejtlich, 2006, 0-321-34996-2,
U$49.99/C$69.99
%A   Richard Bejtlich www.taosecurity.com taosecurity.blogspot.com
%C   P.O. Box 520, 26 Prince Andrew Place, Don Mills, Ontario  M3C 2T8
%D   2006
%G   0-321-34996-2
%I   Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
%O   U$49.99/C$69.99 416-447-5101 800-822-6339 bkexpress@aw.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience a+ Tech 3 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   385 p.
%T   “Extrusion Detection:Security Monitoring for Internal Intrusions”

According to the preface, this book explains the use of extrusion detection (related to egress scanning), to detect intruders who are using client-side attacks to enter or work within your network.   The audience is intended to be architects, engineers, analysts, operators and managers with an intermediate to advanced knowledge of network security.  Background for readers should include knowledge of scripting, network attack tools and controls, basic system administration, TCP/IP, as well as management and policy.  (It should also be understood that those who will get the most out of the text should know not only the concepts of TCP/IP, but advanced level details of packet and log structures.)  Bejtlich notes that he is not explicitly addressing malware or phishing, and provides references for those areas.  (It appears that the work is not directed at information which might detect insider attacks.)

Part one is about detecting and controlling intrusions.  Chapter one reviews network security monitoring, with a basic introduction to security (brief but clear), and then gives an overview of monitoring and listing of some tools.  Defensible network architecture, in chapter two, provides lucid explanations of the basics, but the later sections delve deeply into packets, scripts and configurations.  Managers will understand the fundmental points being made, but pages of the material will be impenetrable unless you have serious hands-on experience with traffic analysis.  Extrusion detection itself is illustrated with intelligible concepts and examples (and a useful survey of the literature) in chapter three.   Chapter four examines both hardware and software instruments for viewing enterprise network traffic.  Useful but limited instances of layer three network access controls are reviewed in chapter five.

Part two addresses network security operations.  Chapter six delves into traffic threat assessment, and, oddly, at this point explains the details of logs, packets, and sessions clearly and in more detail.   A decent outline of the advance planning and basic concepts necessary for network incident response is detailed in chapter seven (although the material is generic and has limited relation to the rest of the content of the book).  Network forensics gets an excellent overview in chapter eight: not just technical points, but stressing the importance of documentation and transparent procedures.

Part three turns to internal intrusions.  Chapter nine is a case study of a traffic threat assessment.  It is, somewhat of necessity, dependent upon detailed examination of logs, but the material demands an advanced background in packet analysis.  The (somewhat outdated) use of IRC channels in botnet command and control is reviewed in chapter ten.

Bejtlich’s prose is clear, informative, and even has touches of humour.  The content is well-organized.  (There is a tendency to use idiosyncratic acronyms, sometimes before they’ve been expanded or defined.)  This work is demanding, particularly for those still at the intermediate level, but does examine an area of security which does not get sufficient attention.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKEXTDET.RVW   20101023