Comment(ary) Spam…

I’m not sure why I feel the urge to keep writing about comment spam: primarily, I suppose it’s because I get so much amusement from it (just as well considering how much of it I read when I moderate comments on the ESET blog), rather than because the world is full of bloggers waiting for me to tell them how to recognize it, even if it isn’t apparently posted by someone called nike soccer shoes or where to buy a laptop or even my personal favourite of the moment, rolling in the deep adele. (Well, there went my favourite heuristic.)

Still, I liked the cheek of this one:

“Throughout the great scheme of things you’ll get a B- for effort. Where you actually confused me personally was first on your particulars. As people say, the devil is in the details… And it couldn’t be more correct here. Having said that, let me inform you what did deliver the results. Your authoring is pretty powerful which is most likely the reason why I am taking the effort in order to comment. I do not make it a regular habit of doing that. 2nd, even though I can easily see a leaps in reason you make, I am not sure of just how you appear to connect the points which inturn produce the final result. For the moment I shall yield to your point but trust in the foreseeable future you actually link the facts better.”

So much so that I did a quick Google to see how common this particular approach is, and sure enough I found a whole bunch of very similar posts – by similar, I mean the same core text with minor changes such as “the great pattern of things”. Apparently, I’m not the only blogger who tends to assume that if a comment is enthusiastic, it’s probably spam.

Thank you for your constructive criticism, Mr feather extensions online: I like your style. But my absolute favourite at the moment is Fritz, who commented dispiritedly that he is “always a big fan of linking to bloggers that I love but don’t get a lot of link love from”: too bad URLs in comments are stripped automatically, or I might have allowed that one through just to put a smile on your face.

David Harley

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David Harley

David Harley has worked in security since 1986, notably as security analyst for a major medical research charity, then as manager of the NHS Threat Assessment Centre. Since 2006 he has worked as an independent consultant. He also holds the position of Senior Research Fellow at ESET. His books include Viruses Revealed and the AVIEN Anti-Malware Defense Guide for the Enterprise. He is a frequent speaker at major security conferences, and a prolific writer of blogs and other articles. If he had any free time, he would probably spend most of it playing the guitar.

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