Enhanced Nigerian scam – linkedin style

Linkedin is a much better platform for Nigerian scammers: They now have my first and last name, information about me, etc. So they can craft the following letter (sent by this guy):

Hello Aviram Jenik,

I am Dr Sherif Akande, a citizen of Ghana, i work with Barclay’s Bank Ltd, Ghana. I have in my bank Existence of the Amount of money valued at $8.400,000.00, the big hurt Belongs to the customer, Peter B.Jenik, who Happen To Have The Same name as yours. The fund is now without any Claim Because, Peter B.Jenik, in a deadly earthquake in China in 2008. I want your cooperation so that bank will send you the fund as the beneficiary and located next of kin to the fund.

This transaction will be of a great mutual assistance to us. Send me your reply of interest so that i will give you the details. Strictly send it to my private email account {sherifakande48@gmail.com} or send me your email address to send you details of this transaction.

At the receipt of your reply, I will give you details of the transaction.I look forward to hear from you. I will send you a scan copy of the deposit certificate.

Send me an email to my private email account {sherifakande48@gmail.com}for more details of the transaction.

Sincerely,
Best Regard’s
Dr Sherif Akande.
Here is my number +233548598269

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Cyberbullying, anonymity, and censorship

Michael Den Tandt’s recent column in the Vancouver Sun is rather a melange, and deserves to have a number of points addressed separately.

First, it is true that the behaviours the “cyberbullying” bill address, those of spreading malicious and false information widely, generally using anonymous or misleading identities, do sound suspiciously close to those behaviours in which politicians engage themselves.  It might be ironic if the politicians got charged under the act.

Secondly, whether bill C-13 is just a thinly veiled re-introduction of the reviled C-30 is an open question.  (As one who works with forensic linguistics, I’d tend to side with those who say that the changes in the bill are primarily cosmetic: minimal changes intended to address the most vociferous objections, without seriously modifying the underlying intent.)

However, Den Tandt closes with an insistence that we need to address the issue of online anonymity.  Removing anonymity from the net has both good points and bad, and it may be that the evil consequences would outweigh the benefits.  (I would have thought that a journalist would have been aware of the importance of anonymous sources of reporting.)

More importantly, this appeal for the banning of anonymity betrays an ignorance of the inherent nature of networked communitcation.  The Internet, and related technologies, have so great an influence on our lives that it is important to know what can, and can’t, be done with it.

The Internet is not a telephone company, where the central office installs all the wires and knows at least where (and therefore likely who) a call came from.  The net is based on technology whish is designed, from the ground up, in such a way that anyone, with any device, can connect to the nearest available source, and have the network, automatically, pass information to or from the relevant person or site.

The fundamental technology that connects the Internet, the Web, social media, and pretty much everything else that is seen as “digital” these days, is not a simple lookup table at a central office.  It is a complex interrelationship of prototcols, servers, and programs that are built to allow anyone to communicate with anyone, without needing to prove your identity or authorization.  Therefore, nobody has the ability to prevent any communication.

There are, currently, a number of proposals to “require” all communications to be identified, or all users to have an identity, or prevent anyone without an authenticated identity from using the Internet.  Any such proposals will ultimately fail, since they ignore the inherent foundational nature of the net.  People can voluntarily participate in such programs–but those people probably wouldn’t have engaged in cyberbullying in any case.

John Gilmore, one of the people who built the basics of the Internet, famously stated that “the Internet interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.”  This fact allows those under oppressive regimes to communicate with the rest of the world–but it also means that pornography and hate speech can’t be prevented.  The price of reasonable commuincations is constant vigilance and taking the time to build awareness.  A wish for a technical or legal shortcut that will be a magic pill and “fix” everything is doomed to fail.

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CyberSec Tips: E-Commerce – tip details 2 – fake sites

Following on with some more of the tips from an earlier post, originally published here:

The next three tips are pretty straightforward, and should be followed:
Don’t click on offers in email.
If it sounds too good to be true, don’t fall for it.
Don’t fall for fake eBay or PayPal sites.

Good advice all around.  In terms of fake eBay or PayPal sites, check the URLs, if you can see them, or the places you end up.  Often fraudsters will try and register sites with odd variations on the name, such as replacing the lower case letter l in PayPal with a digit 1, which can look similar: paypal.com vs paypa1.com.  Or they will send you to a subdirectory on either a legitimate site (for example, googledocs.com/paypal) or on a straight scam site (frauds.ru/paypal).  Or sometimes the URL is simply a mess of characters.  If the site isn’t pretty clearly the one you want, get out of there.

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Source Disclosure vulnerability in Joomla – the dreaded single quote

We have started receiving reports from Joomla users that our ScanMyServer service is picking up an unknown and undocumented vulnerability on their web site.

The scanner is showing that they have one or more source disclosure/path disclosure vulnerabilities. Since they were using the latest and most up to date version of Joomla their reports looked odd and we started to investigate the matter.

We found out that the vulnerability is “hard” to trigger, as Firefox and Internet Explorer will escape the single quote in a URL to its encoded form, while Chrome will not. So while sending it under Chrome will show something like:
Fatal error: Uncaught exception 'InvalidArgumentException' with message 'Invalid URI detected.' in /home/content/41/9236541/html/libraries/joomla/environment/uri.php:194 Stack trace: #0 /home/content/41/9236541/html/libraries/joomla/application/application.php(248): JURI::getInstance() #1 /home/content/41/9236541/html/includes/application.php(135): JApplication->route() #2 /home/content/41/9236541/html/index.php(36): JSite->route() #3 {main} thrown in /home/content/41/9236541/html/libraries/joomla/environment/uri.php on line 194

The same URL under Firefox and Internet Explorer, will return:
404 - Article not found

Of course, the vulnerability is not in Chrome, but is a real issue caused by Joomla not properly escaping the URL.

The problem has been already spotted in a different section of Joomla, the search option, as can be seen by this post: http://joomlacode.org/gf/../?action=TrackerItemEdit&tracker_item_id=31036&start=0

So the problem isn’t just in the search, it also spans to other sections of the Joomla framework.

We will keep you posted when a fix is provided, or we have a workaround for this issue.

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Review of “cloud drives” – Younited – pt 3

Yesterday I received an update for the Younited client–on the Win7 machine.  The XP machine didn’t update, nor was there any option to do so.

This morning Younited won’t accept the password on the Win7 machine: it won’t log on.  Actually, it seems to be randomly forgetting parts of the password.  As with most programs, it doesn’t show the password (nor is there any option to show it), the password is represented by dots for the characters.  But I’ll have seven characters entered (with seven dots showing), and, all of a sudden, only three dots will be showing.  Or I’ll have entered ten, and suddenly there are only two.

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Review of “cloud drives” – Younited – pt 2

My major test of the Younited drive took a few days, but it finally seems to have completed.  In a less than satisfactory manner.

I “synched” a directory on my machine with the Younited drive.  As noted, the synching ran for at least two days.  (My mail and Web access was noticeably slow during that time.)  The original directory, with subdirectories, contained slightly under 7 Gigs of material (the quota for basic Younited drives is said to be 10 G) in slightly under 2,800 files.  The transfer progress now shows 5,899 files transferred, and I’m out of space.

A quick check shows that not all files are on the Younited drive.

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Review of “cloud drives” – Younited – pt 1

I’m trying out various “cloud drives”–or “file transmission services” as my little brother likes to call them, so as not to sully the name of cloud storage–and thought I’d mention a few things about F-Secure’s Younited first.

The reasons it is first are because a) F-Secure is a highly respected antivirus firm and based beyond the reach of the NSA in Finland, b) they are promoting the heck out of the new service by making it practically invitation only and asking that people tweet and blog about it, and c) it is really starting to annoy me.

Supposedly you can access it via the Web or through apps you install on your computer or device.  I have been able to upload a few individual files onto it, and access them on other devices.  Except for the MacBook.  The app seemed to install fine, but then it wouldn’t open anymore.  On the theory that, like SkyDrive, it wouldn’t install on my copy of Snow Leopard (and at least SkyDrive had the decency to tell me that), I upgraded to Maverick (which has created its own problems).  That hasn’t fixed it.  Next step is probably to throw it in the trash and reinstall.

I decided to give it a bit of an acid test tonight, and upload a set of directories.  First off, it seemed to load everything, willy-nilly, into a standard set of folders for “Pictures,” “Videos,” “Music,” etc, regardless of the directories they came from.  At least, that what the app showed.  The Web browser, if you accidentally hit the right button (and I’m darned if I can find out how to get it back) showed the directories–but they were all empty.  A web browser on another machine shows nothing at all.

(A gauge of progress for uploads has been saying “Transferring 635/6475″ for the last several hours, regardless of what else has gone on.)

I thought maybe I might have to create and populate a directory at a time.  That’s when I realized that I can’t make directories.  If you get past the initial level of “Help” FAQs (which don’t have a lot of helpful detail) you can find the “community.”  Do a search on “folders,” and a number of listings come up, included an article on how to organize your files.  This says that, in order

“To create a folder

  1. Go to the younited_folder.PNG younited folder.
  2. Select Create_folder.PNG Create folder.
  3. Type a name for the older and select OK.”

Only problem is, when you click on the younited icon, the “create folder” option or icon never appears.  Other entries are equally “helpful.”  (What is the icon for sarcasm?)

I will, undoubtedly, learn more about the system and how to use it, but, at the moment, it is frustrating in the extreme.

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Has your email been “hacked?”

I got two suspicious messages today.  They were identical, and supposedly “From” two members of my extended family, and to my most often used account, rather than the one I use as a spam trap.  I’ve had some others recently, and thought it a good opportunity to write up something on the general topic of email account phishing.

The headers are no particular help: the messages supposedly related to a Google Docs document, and do seem to come from or through Google.  (Somewhat ironically, at the time the two people listed in these messages might have been sharing information with the rest of us in the family in this manner.  Be suspicious of anything you receive over the Internet, even if you think it might relate to something you are expecting.)

The URLs/links in the message are from TinyURL (which Google wouldn’t use) and, when resolved, do not actually go to Google.  They seem to end up on a phishing site intended to steal email addresses.  It had a Google logo at the top, and asked the user to “sign in” with email addresses (and passwords) from Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, and a few other similar sites.  (The number of possible Webmail sites should be a giveaway in itself: Google would only be interested in your Google account.)

Beware of any messages you receive that look like this:

——- Forwarded message follows ——-
Subject:            Important Documents
Date sent:          Mon, 5 Aug 2013 08:54:26 -0700
From:               [a friend or relative]

*Hello,*
*
How are you doing today? Kindly view the documents i uploaded for you using
Google Docs CLICK HERE <hxxp://tinyurl.com/o2vlrxx>.
——- End of forwarded message ——-

That particular site was only up briefly: 48 hours later it was gone.  This tends to be the case: these sites change very quickly.  Incidentally, when I initially tested it with a few Web reputation systems, it was pronounced clean by all.

This is certainly not the only type of email phishing message: a few years ago there were rafts of messages warning you about virus, spam, or security problems with your email account.  Those are still around: I just got one today:

——- Forwarded message follows ——-
From:               ”Microsoft HelpDesk” <microsoft@helpdesk.com>
Subject:            Helpdesk Mail Box Warning!!!
Date sent:          Wed, 7 Aug 2013 15:56:35 -0200

Helpdesk Mail Support require you to re-validate your Microsoft outlook mail immediately by clicking: hxxp://dktxxxkgek.webs.com/

This Message is From Helpdesk. Due to our latest IP Security upgrades we have reason to believe that your Microsoft outlook mail account was accessed by a third party. Protecting the security of your Microsoft outlook mail account is our primary concern, we have limited access to sensitive Microsoft outlook mail account features.

Failure to re-validate, your e-mail will be blocked in 24 hours.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Help Desk
Microsoft outlook Team
——- End of forwarded message ——-

Do you really think that Microsoft wouldn’t capitalize its own Outlook product?

(Another giveaway on that particular one is that it didn’t come to my Outlook account, mostly because I don’t have an Outlook account.)

(That site was down less than three hours after I received the email.

OK, so far I have only been talking about things that should make you suspicious when you receive them.  But what happens if and when you actually follow through, and get hit by these tricks?  Well, to explain that, we have to ask why the bad guys would want to phish for your email account.  After all, we usually think of phishing in terms of bank accounts, and money.

The blackhats phishing for email accounts might be looking for a number of things.  First, they can use your account to send out spam, and possibly malicious spam, at that.  Second, they can harvest email addresses from your account (and, in particular, people who would not be suspicious of a message when it comes “From:” you).  Third, they might be looking for a way to infect or otherwise get into your computer, using your computer in a botnet or for some other purpose, or stealing additional information (like banking information) you might have saved.  A fourth possibility, depending upon the type of Webmail you have, is to use your account to modify or create malicious Web pages, to serve malware, or do various types of phishing.

What you have to do depends on what it was the bad guys were after in getting into your account.

If they were after email addresses, it’s probably too late.  They have already harvested the addresses.  But you should still change your password on that account, so they won’t be able to get back in.  And be less trusting in future.

The most probable thing is that they were after your account in order to use it to send spam.  Change your password so that they won’t be able to send any more.  (In a recent event, with another relative, the phishers had actually changed the password themselves.  This is unusual, but it happens.  In that case, you have to contact the Webmail provider, and get them to reset your password for you.)  The phishers have probably also sent email to all of your friends (and everyone in your contacts or address list), so you’d better send a message around, ‘fess up to the fact that you’ve been had, and tell your friends what they should do.  (You can point them at this posting.)  Possibly in an attempt to prevent you from finding out that your account has been hacked, the attackers often forward your email somewhere else.  As well as changing your password, check to see if there is any forwarding on your account, and also check to see if associated email addresses have been changed.

It’s becoming less likely that the blackhats want to infect your computer, but it’s still possible.  In that case, you need to get cleaned up.  If you are running Windows, Microsoft’s (free!) program Microsoft Security Essentials (or MSE) does a very good job.  If you aren’t, or want something different, then Avast, Avira, Eset, and Sophos have products available for free download, and for Windows, Mac, iPhone, and Android.  (If you already have some kind of antivirus program running on your machine, you might want to get these anyway, because yours isn’t working, now is it?)

(By the way, in the recent incident, both family members told me that they had clicked on the link “and by then it was too late.”  They were obviously thinking of infection, but, in fact, that particular site wasn’t set up to try and infect the computer.  When they saw the page asked for their email addresses and password, it wasn’t too late.  if they had stopped at that point, and not entered their email addresses and passwords, nothing would have happened!  Be aware, and a bit suspicious.  It’ll keep you safer.)

When changing your password, or checking to see if your Web page has been modified, be very careful, and maybe use a computer that is protected a bit better than your is.  (Avast is very good at telling you if a Web page is trying to send you something malicious, and most of the others do as well.  MSE doesn’t work as well in this regard.)  Possibly use a computer that uses a different operating system: if your computer uses Windows, then use a Mac: if your computer is a Mac, use an Android tablet or something like that.  Usually (though not always) those who set up malware pages are only after one type of computer.

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Fuzzing Samsung Kies

Android fuzzing is always fun – seems that whenever we fuzz an android app it crashes within seconds.

Samsung Kies was no different. With the help of the talented Juan Yacubian (who built the Kies module in no time) we launched beSTORM against Kies… And saw it crash in record 23 seconds (just over 1,100 attack combinations).

Next on the agenda: install gdb for Android and build the proper payload.

Samsung Kies Crash

 

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REVIEW: “The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”, Michael Zalewski

BKTNGWEB.RVW   20121207

“The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”, Michael Zalewski, 2012, 978-1-59327-388-0, U$49.95/C$52.95
%A   Michael Zalewski
%C   555 De Haro Street, Suite 250, San Francisco, CA   94107
%D   2012
%G   978-1-59327-388-0 1-59327-388-6
%I   No Starch Press
%O   U$49.95/C$52.95 415-863-9900 fax 415-863-9950 info@nostarch.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience a Tech 2 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   299 p.
%T   “The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”

In the preface, the author dismisses security experts as academic, ineffectually worried, and unaware of the importance of the Web.  (Zalewski makes reference to a “confused deputy problem” being “regularly” referred to in academic security literature.  I’ve never heard of it.)  He blames them for the current insecure state of Web applications.  I suspect this is a bit unfair, given the “citizen programmer” status of huge numbers of Web projects, and the time and feature pressure this places on the rest.  It is unfortunate that some security specialists have not regarded the Web as significant, but it is critical that most security specialist don’t know how to program, and most programmers don’t care anything about security.

He also says the book is about repentance, and a step towards normalcy.  (Normalcy is not defined.

Chapter one is an introduction, both to information security, and to Web application development.  Starting off by misattributing one of Gene Spafford’s quotes, the author complains about any and all attempts to structure or define security.  (Rather inconsistently, while he derides taxonomies, he does recommend designing systems so as to deal with “classes” of bugs.  The difference between a class and a taxon is not explained.)

Part one outlines the principal concepts of the Web.  Chapter two starts us off with the URL (Uniform Resource Locator), noting some of the problems with different types of encoding.  From this point in the book, each chapter concludes with a “Security Engineering Cheat Sheet,” listing potential problems, and suggesting broad approaches (without details) to dealing with those issues.  HTTP (the HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the subject of chapter three, primarily concerning the handling of user data.  (Since the author is fond of quotes, I’ll give him one from Tony Buckland, several years before the invention of the Web: “The client interface is the boundary of trustworthiness.”)  Chapters four to eight cover HTML (HyperText Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), browser scripting (concentrating exclusively on JavaScript), non-HTML data (mostly XML), and plug-ins.

Part two turns to browser security features.  Chapter nine talks about isolating content, so that different sites or documents don’t interfere with each other.  Determining where and to whom a page belongs is addressed in chapter ten.  Chapter eleven expands the details of problems caused by allowing disparate documents to interact.  Other security boundaries, such as local storage, networks, ports, and cookies, are reviewed in chapter twelve.  Recognizing content, when the “Content-Type” description may be problematic, is in chapter thirteen.  Chapter fourteen suggests ways to deal with malicious scripts.  Specifically setting or raising permissions is discussed in chapter fifteen.

Part three looks ahead to Web application security issues as they may develop in the future.  New and coming security features are noted in chapters sixteen and seventeen.  Chapter eighteen reviews the all-too-common Web vulnerabilities (such as cross-site scripting and “Referer” leakage).

Absent the complaints about the rest of the security field, this is a decent and technical guide to problems which should be considered for any Web application project.  It’s not a cookbook, but provides solid advice for designers and developers.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKTNGWEB.RVW   20121207

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Nopcon 2013 is here

Douglas Adams is still right: No language has the phrase “As pretty as an airport”. But in my humble opinion, airports have come a long way in the last 10 years. Or maybe my expectations have become so low, I can’t be disappointed. Either way, it seems to me going through an airport isn’t as bad or boring or inconvenient as it used to be.
I’m not just talking about the East-Asian airports (Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore) which have always been stellar. Even the infamous American airports are newer, and more convenient.

I’m giving you this airport cheer-leading chant because if you live in Europe, you should go and check out how much your airport has improved since you’ve last seen it. Then, take a flight to Istanbul. Not just because Istanbul is one of the nicest cities in Europe but also because Nopcon is taking place June 6, and has some very interesting and incredibly original speaker lineup: Moti Joseph, Nikita Tarakanov, Gökhan Alkan, Svetlana Gaivoronski, Canberk Bolat and Ahmet Cihan (aka Hurby). Nice!

More info here: http://www.nopcon.org/

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S. Korea Cyber Attack Crashes Navigation Devices. Time to fuzz your GPS?

South Korea suffered a major cyber attack yesterday. The origin of the attack seems to be China at the moment, but that is far from being definite.

I happened to be in one of the (several) cyber security operation centers, by pure coincidence. I had a chance to see events unravel in real time. Several banks have been hit (including the very large shinhan bank) and a few broadcasting channels.

The damage is hard to assess, since it’s now in everyone’s advantage to blame the cyber attack on anything from a system crash to the coffee machine running out of capsules. Budget and political moves will dominate most of the data that will be released in the next few days.
It’s clear, however, that the damage substantial. I reached out to a few friends in technical positions at various MSPs and most had a sleepless night. They’ve been hit hard.

The most interesting part of this incident, in my opinion, was a report on car GPS crashing while the attack was taking place. I haven’t seen a news report about that yet, and I couldn’t personally verify it (as I mentioned, I was stationary at the time, watching the frantic cyber-security team getting a handle on a difficult situation) but this is making rounds in security forums and a couple of friends confirmed to me that their car navigation system crashed and had to be restarted, at the exact time the attack was taking place.

The most likely explanation is that the broadcasting companies, who send TPEG data to the GPS devices (almost every car in Korea has a GPS device, almost all get real-time updates via TPEG), had sent malformed data which caused the devices to crash. This data could have been just a result of a domino effect from the networks crashing, or it could have been a very sophisticated proof-of-concept by the attacker to see if they can create a distruption. Traffic in Seoul is bad even on a normal day; without GPS devices it can be a nightmare.

Which brings up an interesting point about fuzzing network devices. TPEG fuzzers have been available for a while now (beSTORM has a TPEG module, and you can easily write your own TPEG fuzzer). The difficult part is getting the GPS device to communicate with the fuzzing generator; this is something the GPS developer can do (but probably won’t) but it is also possible for a government entity to do the necessary configuration to make that happen, given the proper resources or simply by forcing the vendors to cooperate.

The choice of the attacker to bring down the broadcasting networks might be deliberate: other than knocking TV and radio off the air (an obvious advantage in a pre-attack strike) the broadcasting networks control many devices who rely on their data. Forcing them to send malformed data to crash a variety of devices can have interesting implications. If I was a little more naive, I would predict that this will push governments around the world to focus more on fuzzing to discover these kind of vulnerabilities before they see their adversaries exploit them. But in the world we live in, they will instead throw around the phrase “APT” and buy more “APT detection products” (an oximoron if I’ve ever heard one). Thank god for APT, the greatest job saving invention since bloodletting.

An detailed analysis of the attack here:

http://training.nshc.net/KOR/Document/virus/20130321_320CyberTerrorIncidentResponseReportbyRedAlert(EN).pdf

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Why can’t my laptop figure out what time zone I’m in, like my cell phone does?

We got new cell phones (mobiles, for you non-North Americans) recently.  In the time since we last bought phones they have added lots of new features, like texting, cameras, email and Google Maps.

This, plus the fact that I am away on a trip right now, and Gloria has to calculate what time it is for me when we communicate (exacerbated by the fact that I never change the time zone on the laptops to local time), prompted her to ask the question above.  (She knows that I have an NTP client that updates the time on a regular basis.  She’s even got the associated clocks, on her desktop, in pink.)

Cell phones, of course, have to know where they are (or, at least, the cellular system has to know where they are) very precisely, so they can be told, by the nearest cell tower, what time it is (or, at least, what time it is for that tower).

Computers, however, have no way of knowing where they are, I explained.  And then realized that I had made an untrue statement.

Computers can find out (or somebody can find out) where a specific computer is when they are on the net.  (And you have to be on the net to get time updates.)  Some Websites use this (sometimes startlingly accurate) information in a variety of amusing (and sometimes annoying or frightening) ways.  So it is quite possible for a laptop to find out what time zone it is in, when it updates the time.

Well, if it is possible, then, in these days of open source, surely someone has done it.  Except that a quick couple of checks (with AltaVista and Google) didn’t find anything like that.  There does seem to be some interest:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8049912/how-can-i-get-the-network-time-from-the-automatic-setting-called-use-netw

and there seems to be an app for an Android phone:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ru.org.amip.ClockSync&hl=en

(which seems silly since you can already get that from the phone side), but I couldn’t find an actual client or system for a computer or laptop.

So, any suggestions?

Or, anybody interested in a project?

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Blatant much?

So a friend of mine posts (on Twitter) a great shot of a clueless phishing spammer:

So I reply:
@crankypotato Were only all such phishing spammers so clueless. (Were only all users clueful enough to notice …)

So some other scammer tries it out on me:
Max Dubberly  @Maxt4dxsviida
@rslade http://t.co/(dangerous URL that I’m not going to include, obviously)

I don’t know exactly where that URL redirects, but when I tried it, in a safe browser, Avast immediately objected …

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What happens when your user changes his password?

You just forced the user to change his password; periodic password changing is good policy, right?

Now lets see what happens next:

  • The user sends the password to himself by email, in plaintext, so he won’t forget. Now it’s in his inbox, viewable on the email ‘preview’ section to anyone shoulder surfing
  • He then writes it on a post-it note. The cleaning person threw out the previous password (but that’s ok, he finally remembered it). Now there’s a post it with the password in the top right drawer
  • He then sends it to his wife/friend/colleague who also uses the account sometimes. Now it’s in another person’s inbox, again in a preview pane. He might have typed their email wrong and sent it to someone else by mistake, or maybe they put it on a post-it note too
  • The next time he tries to login he will use the old password (that he remembers) and fail. Your system will lock him out, and he will call to have it released. Another false positive that makes the person auditing the log for lock outs not pay attention to the warnings
  • He will then sign up to the new and cool social web site and use this last password as his password there. It’s already on the post-it note: Why write another? This new social web site will soon be cracked and your user’s password will be available online

Remind me again why changing passwords periodically is good for security? Oh, I get it. You were just living up to the bad reputation and preventing ease of use.

 

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SMS Apple (malware) spam on Bell Mobility (Canada)

SMS spam on Bell seems to have suddenly jumped.  On Tuesday, both Gloria and I got spam saying we had won something from Apple.  Today, we both got similar spam.

Today’s message came “from” 240-393-8527.  It asked us to visit hxxp://www.apple.com.ca.llhf.net [1]

Neither F-Secure nor VirusTotal had anything to say about it, but it is safe to assume that the site is dangerous.  Avast now blocks it.

In trying to contact Bell about this, I noted that Bell’s Website “contact” page lists a “Chat with us” function that simply does nothing if agents are busy, and no means of contacing Bell via email.  “How to escalate a complaint” returns the same page, with the same lack of response from the agent button.  When I finally did reach an agent, “he” was pretty clueless about the whole situation.  I strongly suspected “he” was a rather simplistic program.

Having Given the agent the information above, his response was to ask “Samuel: I understand. Have you registered under apple newsletter list?”  He then asked for my name and phone number (which I had previously given him at the beginning of the session), and then told me “Samuel: I unfortunately cannot unsubscribe that spam for you from here as I see in your account.”  He offered to cut the SMS/texting function on my account.

That’s it.  That’s the only solution.  Bell doesn’t have any spam filtering on SMS, even when the spam is as obvious, egregious, and malicious as this one.  (Yes, they do have a spam filtering option, if you want to pay them an extra $5 per month.  Given the quality of support, I think I’ll give that a miss.)

[1] Note that this isn’t apple.com, the trailing “domains” override that.  This domain is listed to:

Domain Name ………………… llhf.net
Name Server ………………… ns5.myhostadmin.net
ns6.myhostadmin.net
Registrant Name …………….. jun wang
Registrant Organization ……… wang jun
Registrant Address ………….. shang hai shi xu hui qu
Registrant City …………….. shang hai
Registrant Province/State ……. SH
Registrant Postal Code ………. 200087
Registrant Country Code ……… cn
Registrant Phone Number ……… 02178861511
Registrant Fax ……………… 02178861511
Registrant Email ……………. yaobing349@hotmail.com

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