CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – email accounts – example 1

Sometimes phishers are after more than your bank account or credit cards.  These days a lot of them want your email account.  They can use it to send spam, to your friends, and those friends will trust a message from you.  (That’s a more reliable form of social engineering to get them to install malware on their computers.  Or give up their bank accounts and credit card numbers …)

> Dear user
> Your email has exceeded 2 GB, which is created by Webmaster, you are currently
> running at 2.30GB, you can not Send or receive new messages until you check your
> account.Complete the form below to verify your account.

Sometimes the email phishers will send you this “over quota” message.  Other times it may be that you are, supposedly, sending out malware or spam yourself.

> Please complete the details below to confirm your account
>
> (1) E-mail:
> (2) Name:
> (3) Password:
> (4) Confirm Password:

Here they just flat out ask you for your user name and password.

Spam isn’t the only thing they can do with your account.  These days Web based email accounts can be linked to storage space and other functions.  Google accounts are very valuable, since they give the phishers access to Google+ (with lots of personal information about you), YouTube, and Google Drive (which still has Google Docs in it, and can be used to set up phishing Websites).

Again, watch for telltale signs in the headers:

To:                 Recipients <web@epamig.br>
From:               HELP DESK<web@epamig.br>
Date sent:          Sun, 01 Dec 2013 14:01:47 +0100
Send reply to:      647812717@qq.com

It isn’t “to” you, and the “reply” isn’t the same as the “from.”

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CyberSec Tips: E-Commerce – tip details 1 – search engines

Our local paper, like just about everyone else, recently published a set of tips for online shopping.  (They got them from Trend Micro Canada.)  The tips are mostly OK, as far as they go, but I figured they could use a little expansion.

“Don’t rely on search engines to find a shopping site.

“Search results can lead to malicious websites that will take your credit card and other confidential data or infect your computer with a virus. Instead, bookmark reliable online shopping sites.”

As a general rule, it’s best to be careful whenever you go to a site that is new or unknown to you.  However, I’d have to take this tip with a grain of salt.  I did a (Google) search on London Drugs, a chain in Western Canada (widely known in the tech community for their computer departments) (about which I have written before), and the first five pages gave results that were all from, or legitimately about, that company.  Quick checks on other retailers got similar results.

It makes sense to bookmark a “known good” link if you shop someplace regularly.  But if you are going to a new site, you can get into just as much trouble by guessing at a domain name, or even just fumbling typing the URL.  Fraudsters will register a number of domain names that are very similar to those of legitimate companies; just a character or so off; knowing that slipping fingers will drive people to their sites.  Some of those malicious sites look very much like the real thing.  (Others, promoting all kinds of questionable services and deals, are obviously false.)

Always be careful, and suspicious.  If anything seems off, get out of there, and maybe do a bit of research before you try again.  But don’t just avoid search engines as a matter of course.

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CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 3

This one is slightly interesting, in that it contains elements of both 419 and phishing.  It’s primarily an advance fee fraud message.  First off, the headers:

> Subject: Dear Winner!!!
> From: CHELPT <inf8@hotline.onmicrosoft.com>
> Date: Thu, 28 Nov 2013 17:45:06 +0530
> Reply-To: <morrluke@careceo.com>
> Message-ID: <XXX.eurprd01.prod.exchangelabs.com>

Again, we see different domains, in particular, a different address to reply to, as opposed to where it is supposed to be from.

> Corporate Headquarters
> Technical Office Chevrolet promotion unit
> 43/45 The Promenade…
> Head Office Chevrolet motors
> 43/45 The Promenade Cheltenham
> Ref: UK/9420X2/68
> Batch: 074/05/ZY369
> Chevrolet Canter, London, SE1 7NA – United Kingdom

My, my, my.  With all that addressing and reference numbers, it certainly looks official.  But isn’t.

> Dear Winner,
>
> Congratulations, you have just won a cash prize of £1,000, 000, 00. One million
> Great British Pounds Sterling (GBP) in the satellite software email lottery.
> On-line Sweepstakes International program held on this day Satur day 23rd
> November 2013 @05:42.PM London time. Conducted by CHEVROLET LOTTERY BOARD in
> which your e-mail address was pick randomly by software powered by the Internet
> send data’s to;
> ——————————————————————————–
> Tell: +44 701 423 4661             Email: morrluke@careceo.com Officer Name: Mr.
> Morrison Luke. CHEVROLET LOTTERY BOARD London UK
> ——————————————————————————–

As usual, you have supposedly won something.  If you reply, of course, there will start to be fees or taxes that you have to pay before the money is released to you.  The amounts will start out small (hey, who wouldn’t be willing to pay a hundred pound “processing fee” in order to get a million pounds, right?) but then get larger.  (Once you’ve paid something, then you would tend to be willing to pay more.  Protecting your investment, as it were.)  And, of course you will never see a cent of your winnings, inheritance, charity fund, etc, etc.

> Below is the claims and verifications form. You are expected to fill and return
> it immediately so we can start processing your claims:
>
> 1. Full Names:
> 2. Residential Address:
> 3. Direct Phone No:
> 4. Fax Number
> 5. Occupation:
> 6. Sex:
> 7. Age:
> 8. Nationality:
> 9. Annual Income:
> 10. Won Before:
> 11. Batch number: CHELPT1611201310542PM
> 12: Ticket Numbers: 69475600545-72113
> 13: Lucky numbers: 31-6-26-13-35-7

But here, they are starting to ask you for a lot of personal information.  This could be used for identity theft.  Ultimately, they might ask for your bank account information, in order to transfer your winnings.  Given enough other data on you, they could then empty your account.

> We wish you the best of luck as you spend your good fortune thank you for being
> part of our commemorative yearly Draws.
>
> Sincerely,
> Mrs. Susan Chris.
> CHEVROLET LOTTERY PROMOTION TEAM.

Oh, yeah.  Good luck on ever getting any of this money.

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CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – example 2

Some of you may have a BarclayCard credit card.  You might receive a reminder message that looks like the one below.  (Actually, the only credit card company I know that actually sends email reminders is American Express, which I think is a black mark on their security record.)

> Subject: Barclaycard Payment is due
> From: “Barclaycard” <barclaycard@card.com>
> Received: from smtp.alltele.net

If you look at the message headers, you might note that this message doesn’t come from where it says it comes from, and that’s something of which to beware.

> Your barclaycard payment is due
>
> Visit your card service section below to proceed
> hxxp://www.equivalente.it/rss/re.html

You might also note that, it you do have a BarclayCard, it’s probably because you live in the UK.  And the server they want you to visit is in Italy: .it

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CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Phishing – example 1

Phishing is pretty constant these days.  One of the tips to identify phishing messages is if you don’t have an account at that particular bank.  Unfortunately, a lot of people who are online have accounts with Paypal, so Paypal is becoming a favourite with phishers.  You’ll probably get a message something like this:

Subject: Your account access has been limited
From: service@paypal.co.uk <notice@paypal6.co.uk>

(You might think twice if you have an account with Paypal in the United States, but this domain is in the UK.)

> PayPal is constantly working to ensure security by regularly screening the
>accounts in our system. We recently reviewed your account, and we need more
>information to help us provide you with secure service. Until we can
> collect  this information, your access to sensitive account features will be
> limited. We would like to restore your access as soon as possible, and we
> apologize     for the inconvenience.

>    Why is my account access limited?

>    Your account access has been limited for the following reason(s):

> November 27, 2013: We would like to ensure that your account was not
> accessed by an unauthorized third party. Because protecting the security of
> your account is our primary concern, we have limited access to sensitive
> PayPal account features. We understand that this may be an inconvenience but
> please understand that this temporary limitation is for your protection.

>    Case ID Number: PP-197-849-152

>You must click the link below and enter your password for email on the following page to review your account. hxxp://dponsk.ru/wp-admins/.pay/

> Please visit the hxxp://dponsk.ru/wp-admins/.pay Resolution Center and
> complete the Steps to Remove Limitations.

Sounds official, right?  But notice that the URLs given have nothing to do with Paypal.  Also notice, given the .ru domain, that they are in Russia.  Don’t click on those links.  Neither Paypal of anybody else is going to send you these type of messages these days.

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CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 2

Another advance fee/419 fraud is the lottery.

> Subject: Dear User
> To: Recipients <info@notizia348.onmicrosoft.com>
> From: Alexander brown <info@notizia348.onmicrosoft.com>

Again, your email address, which supposedly “won” this lottery, is missing: this message is being sent to many people.  (If you really had won millions, don’t you think they’d take a bit more care getting it to you?)

> Dear Internet User,
>  We are pleased to inform you again of the result of the Internet Promotional
>  Draws. All email addresses entered for this promotional draws were randomly
>  inputted from an internet resource database using the Synchronized
> Data Collective Balloting Program.

Sounds impressive.  But it really doesn’t mean anything.  In the first place, you never entered.  And why would anyone set up a lottery based simply on random email sent around the net?  There is no benefit to anyone in that, not even as a promotion.

>  This is our second letter to you. After this automated computer ballot,your
>  email address was selected in Category A with Ref Number: GTL03-2013 and
>  E-Ticket Number: EUB/8974IT,this qualifies you to be the recipient of t
> he grand prize award sum of (US$2,500,000.00) Two Million, Five Hundred Thousand
> United States Dollars.

This is interesting: it presents still more impressive stuff–that really has no meaning.  It starts by saying this is the second message to you, implying that you missed the first.  This is intended to make you anxious, and probably a bit less questioning about things.  Watch out for anything that tries to rush or push you.

The numbers, of course, are meant to sound official, but are meaningless.

>  The payout of this cash prize to you will be subject to the final validations
>  and satisfactory report that you are the bona fide owner of the winning email
>  address. In line with the governing rules of claim, you are requ
> ired to establish contact with your designated claims agent via email or
> telephone with the particulars below:
>  Enquiry Officer: Mr. Samuel Trotti
> Phone: +39 3888146161
> Email: trottioffice@aim.com

Again, note that the person you are to contact is not the one (or even the same domain) as sent the message.

>  You may establish contact with the Enquiry Officer via the e-mail address above
>  with the information’s necessary: Name:, Address:, Phone:, Cell Phone:, Email:,
>  Alternative Email:, Occupation:, Ref Number and E-Ticket Number. All winnings
>  must be claimed within 14 days from today. After this date all unclaimed funds
>  would be included in the next stake. Remember to quote your reference
>  information in all correspondence with your claims agent.

This is interesting: the amount of information they ask from you means that this might not simply be advance fee fraud, but they might be doing phishing and identity theft, as well.

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CyberSec Tips: Email – Spam – Fraud – example 1

A lot of the advance fee fraud (also called 419 or Nigerian scams) these days say you’ve been named in a will:

> Subject: WILL EXECUTION!!!
> To: Recipients <clifordchance08@cliffordchance854.onmicrosoft.com>
> From: Clifford Chance <clifordchance08@cliffordchance854.onmicrosoft.com>

Note in this case that the message is sent “to” the person who sent it.  This is often an indication that many people have been sent the same message by being “blind” copied on it.  In any case, it wasn’t sent specifically to you.

> Late Mr.Robert Adler bequeathed US$20,500,000.00 USD, to you in his will.More
> info,contact your attorney(Clifford Chance Esq) via email
> address:clf.chance@hotmail.com  Tell+44-871-974-9198

This message doesn’t tell you very much: sometimes they have a reference to a recent tragic event.

Note also that the email address you are supposed to contact is not the same address that sent the message.  This is always suspicious.  (So is giving a phone number.)

If you look into the headers, there are more oddities:

> From: Clifford Chance <clifordchance08@cliffordchance854.onmicrosoft.com>
> Reply-To: <clf.chance@hotmail.com>
> Message-ID: <XXXX@SINPR02MB153.apcprd02.prod.outlook.com>

There are not only three different email addresses, but three different domains.  Microsoft owns Hotmail, and Hotmail became Outlook, so it’s possible, but it’s still a bit odd.

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Risk management and security theatre

Bruce Schneier is often outrageous, these days, but generally worth reading.  In a piece for Forbes in late August, he made the point that, due to fear and the extra trouble casued by TSA regulations, more people were driving rather than flying, and, thus, more people were dying.

“The inconvenience of extra passenger screening and added costs at airports after 9/11 cause many short-haul passengers to drive to their destination instead, and, since airline travel is far safer than car travel, this has led to an increase of 500 U.S. traffic fatalities per year.”

So, by six years after the event, the TSA had killed more US citizens than had the terrorists.  And continues to kill them.

Given the recent NSA revelations, I suppose this will sound like more US-bashing, but I don’t see it that way.  It’s another example of the importance of *real* risk management, taking all factors into account.

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Bank of Montreal online banking insecurity

I’ve had an account with the Bank of Montreal for almost 50 years.

I’m thinking that I may have to give it up.

BMO’s online banking is horrendously insecure.  The password is restricted to six characters.  It is tied to telephone banking, which means that the password is actually the telephone pad numeric equivalent of your password.  You can use that numeric equivalent or any password you like that fits the same numeric equivalent.  (Case is, of course, completely irrelevant.)

My online access to the accounts has suddenly stopped working.  At various times, over the years, I have had problems with the access and had to go to the bank to find out why.  The reasons have always been weird, and the process of getting access again convoluted.  At present I am using, for access, the number of a bank debit card that I never use as a debit card.  (Or even an ATM card.)  The card remains in the file with the printed account statements.

Today when I called about the latest problem, I had to run through the usual series of inane questions.  Yes, I knew how long my password had to be.  Yes, I knew my password.  Yes, it was working until recently.  No, it didn’t work on online banking.  No, it didn’t work on telephone banking.

The agent (no, sorry, “service manager,” these days) was careful to point out that he was *not* going to ask me for my password.  Then he set up a conference call with the online banking system, and had me key in my password over the phone.

(OK, it’s unlikely that even a trained musician could catch all six digits from the DTMF tones on one try.  But a machine could do it easily.)

After all that, the apparent reason for the online banking not working is that the government has mandated that all bank cards now be chipped.  So, without informing me, and without sending me a new card, the bank has cancelled my access.  ( I suppose that is secure.  If you are not counting on availability, or access to audit information.)

(I also wonder, if that was the reason, why the “service manager” couldn’t just look up the card number and determine that the access had been cancelled, rather than having me try to sign in.)

I’ll probably go and close my account this afternoon.

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Has your email been “hacked?”

I got two suspicious messages today.  They were identical, and supposedly “From” two members of my extended family, and to my most often used account, rather than the one I use as a spam trap.  I’ve had some others recently, and thought it a good opportunity to write up something on the general topic of email account phishing.

The headers are no particular help: the messages supposedly related to a Google Docs document, and do seem to come from or through Google.  (Somewhat ironically, at the time the two people listed in these messages might have been sharing information with the rest of us in the family in this manner.  Be suspicious of anything you receive over the Internet, even if you think it might relate to something you are expecting.)

The URLs/links in the message are from TinyURL (which Google wouldn’t use) and, when resolved, do not actually go to Google.  They seem to end up on a phishing site intended to steal email addresses.  It had a Google logo at the top, and asked the user to “sign in” with email addresses (and passwords) from Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, and a few other similar sites.  (The number of possible Webmail sites should be a giveaway in itself: Google would only be interested in your Google account.)

Beware of any messages you receive that look like this:

——- Forwarded message follows ——-
Subject:            Important Documents
Date sent:          Mon, 5 Aug 2013 08:54:26 -0700
From:               [a friend or relative]

*Hello,*
*
How are you doing today? Kindly view the documents i uploaded for you using
Google Docs CLICK HERE <hxxp://tinyurl.com/o2vlrxx>.
——- End of forwarded message ——-

That particular site was only up briefly: 48 hours later it was gone.  This tends to be the case: these sites change very quickly.  Incidentally, when I initially tested it with a few Web reputation systems, it was pronounced clean by all.

This is certainly not the only type of email phishing message: a few years ago there were rafts of messages warning you about virus, spam, or security problems with your email account.  Those are still around: I just got one today:

——- Forwarded message follows ——-
From:               ”Microsoft HelpDesk” <microsoft@helpdesk.com>
Subject:            Helpdesk Mail Box Warning!!!
Date sent:          Wed, 7 Aug 2013 15:56:35 -0200

Helpdesk Mail Support require you to re-validate your Microsoft outlook mail immediately by clicking: hxxp://dktxxxkgek.webs.com/

This Message is From Helpdesk. Due to our latest IP Security upgrades we have reason to believe that your Microsoft outlook mail account was accessed by a third party. Protecting the security of your Microsoft outlook mail account is our primary concern, we have limited access to sensitive Microsoft outlook mail account features.

Failure to re-validate, your e-mail will be blocked in 24 hours.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Help Desk
Microsoft outlook Team
——- End of forwarded message ——-

Do you really think that Microsoft wouldn’t capitalize its own Outlook product?

(Another giveaway on that particular one is that it didn’t come to my Outlook account, mostly because I don’t have an Outlook account.)

(That site was down less than three hours after I received the email.

OK, so far I have only been talking about things that should make you suspicious when you receive them.  But what happens if and when you actually follow through, and get hit by these tricks?  Well, to explain that, we have to ask why the bad guys would want to phish for your email account.  After all, we usually think of phishing in terms of bank accounts, and money.

The blackhats phishing for email accounts might be looking for a number of things.  First, they can use your account to send out spam, and possibly malicious spam, at that.  Second, they can harvest email addresses from your account (and, in particular, people who would not be suspicious of a message when it comes “From:” you).  Third, they might be looking for a way to infect or otherwise get into your computer, using your computer in a botnet or for some other purpose, or stealing additional information (like banking information) you might have saved.  A fourth possibility, depending upon the type of Webmail you have, is to use your account to modify or create malicious Web pages, to serve malware, or do various types of phishing.

What you have to do depends on what it was the bad guys were after in getting into your account.

If they were after email addresses, it’s probably too late.  They have already harvested the addresses.  But you should still change your password on that account, so they won’t be able to get back in.  And be less trusting in future.

The most probable thing is that they were after your account in order to use it to send spam.  Change your password so that they won’t be able to send any more.  (In a recent event, with another relative, the phishers had actually changed the password themselves.  This is unusual, but it happens.  In that case, you have to contact the Webmail provider, and get them to reset your password for you.)  The phishers have probably also sent email to all of your friends (and everyone in your contacts or address list), so you’d better send a message around, ‘fess up to the fact that you’ve been had, and tell your friends what they should do.  (You can point them at this posting.)  Possibly in an attempt to prevent you from finding out that your account has been hacked, the attackers often forward your email somewhere else.  As well as changing your password, check to see if there is any forwarding on your account, and also check to see if associated email addresses have been changed.

It’s becoming less likely that the blackhats want to infect your computer, but it’s still possible.  In that case, you need to get cleaned up.  If you are running Windows, Microsoft’s (free!) program Microsoft Security Essentials (or MSE) does a very good job.  If you aren’t, or want something different, then Avast, Avira, Eset, and Sophos have products available for free download, and for Windows, Mac, iPhone, and Android.  (If you already have some kind of antivirus program running on your machine, you might want to get these anyway, because yours isn’t working, now is it?)

(By the way, in the recent incident, both family members told me that they had clicked on the link “and by then it was too late.”  They were obviously thinking of infection, but, in fact, that particular site wasn’t set up to try and infect the computer.  When they saw the page asked for their email addresses and password, it wasn’t too late.  if they had stopped at that point, and not entered their email addresses and passwords, nothing would have happened!  Be aware, and a bit suspicious.  It’ll keep you safer.)

When changing your password, or checking to see if your Web page has been modified, be very careful, and maybe use a computer that is protected a bit better than your is.  (Avast is very good at telling you if a Web page is trying to send you something malicious, and most of the others do as well.  MSE doesn’t work as well in this regard.)  Possibly use a computer that uses a different operating system: if your computer uses Windows, then use a Mac: if your computer is a Mac, use an Android tablet or something like that.  Usually (though not always) those who set up malware pages are only after one type of computer.

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Click on everything?

You clicked on that link, didn’t you?  I’m writing a posting about malicious links in postings and email, and you click on a link in my posting.  How silly is that?

(No, it wouldn’t have been dangerous, in this case.  I disabled the URL by “x”ing out the “tt” in http;” (which is pretty standard practice in malware circles), and further “x”ed out a couple of the letters in the URL.)

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(Photo) Copyist’s error?

Students of the classics and ancient documents are used to checking for copyist errors, but a photocopier?

And, of course, you can’t trust the machine to check the copy against the original, since it will probably make the same mistake every time.

Actually, with absolutely everything in the world going digital, this type of problem is becoming inevitable, and endemic.  Analogue systems have problems, but digital systems are subject to catastrophic collapse.

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A virus too big to fail?

Once upon a time, many years ago, a school refused to take my advice (mediated through my brother) as to what to do about a very simple computer virus infection.  The infection in question was Stoned, which was a boot sector infector.   BSIs generally do not affect data, and (and this is the important point) are not eliminated by deleting files on the computer, and often not even by reformatting the hard disk.  (At the time there were at least a dozen simple utilities for removing Stoned, most of them free.)

The school decided to cleanse it’s entire computer network by boxing it up, shipping it back to the store, and having the store reformat everything.  Which the store did.  The school lost it’s entire database of student records, and all databases for the library.  Everything had to be re-entered.  By hand.

I’ve always thought this was the height of computer virus stupidity, and that the days when anyone would be so foolish were long gone.

I was wrong.  On both counts.

“In December 2011 the Economic Development Administration (an agency under the US Department of Commerce) was notified by the Department of Homeland Security that it had a malware infection spreading around its network.

“They isolated their department’s hardware from other government networks, cut off employee email, hired an outside security contractor, and started systematically destroying $170,000 worth of computers, cameras, mice, etc.”

The only reason they *stopped* destroying computer equipment and devices was because they ran out of money.  For the destruction process.

Malware is my field, and so I often sound like a bit of a nut, pointing out issues that most people consider minor.  However, malware, while now recognized as a threat, is a field that extremely few people, even in the information security field, study in any depth.  Most general security texts (and, believe me, I know almost all of them) touch on it only tangentially, and often provide advice that is long out of date.

With that sort of background, I can, unfortunately, see this sort of thing happening again.

 

Lest you think I exaggerate any of this, you can read the actual report.

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REVIEW: “Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”, Mitch Tulloch

BKSCPRO2.RVW   20121122

“Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”, Mitch Tulloch,
2012, 0735668833, U$9.99
%A   Mitch Tulloch info@mtit.com www.mtit.com
%C   1 Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA   98052-6399
%D   2012
%G   0735668833
%I   Microsoft Press
%O   U$9.99 800-MSPRESS fax: 206-936-7329 mspinput@microsoft.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   100 p.
%T   “Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”

Reducing the complex jargon in the introduction to its simplest terms, this book is intended to allow anyone who uses the Microsoft Office 2010 suite, or the online Office 365, to effectively employ the security functions built into the software.  Chapter one purports to present the “why” of security, but does a very poor job of it.  Company policy is presented as a kind of threat to the employee, and this does nothing to ameliorate the all-too-common perception that security is there simply to make life easier for the IT department, while it makes work harder for everyone else.

Chapter two examines the first security function, called “Protected View.”  The text addresses issues of whether or not you can trust a document created by someone else, and mentions trusted locations.  (Trusted locations seem simply to be defined as a specified directory on your hard drive, and the text does not discuss whether merely moving an unknown document into this directory will magically render it trustworthy.  Also, the reader is told how to set a trusted location, but not an area for designating untrusted files.)  Supposedly “Protected View” will automatically restrict access to, and danger from, documents you receive from unknown sources.  Unfortunately, having used Microsoft Office 2010 for a couple of years, and having received, in that time, hundreds of documents via email and from Web sources, I’ve never yet seen “Protected View,” so I’m not sure how far I can trust what the author is telling me.  (In addition, Tulloch’s discussion of viruses had numerous errors: Concept came along five years before Melissa, and some of the functions he attributes to Melissa are, in fact, from the CHRISTMA exec over a decade earlier.)

Preparation of policy is promised in chapter three, but this isn’t what most managers or security professionals would think of as policy: it is just the provision of a function for change detection or digital signatures.  It also becomes obvious, at this point, that Microsoft Office 2010 and Office 365 can have significantly different operations.  The material is quite confusing with references to a great many programs which are not part of the two (2010 and 365) MS Office suites.

Chapter four notes the possibility of encryption with a password, but the discussion of rights is unclear, and a number of steps are missing.

An appendix lists pointers to a number of references at Microsoft’s Website.

The utility of this work is compromised by the fact that it provides instructions for functions, but doesn’t really explain how, and in what situations, the functions can assist and protect the user.  Any employee using Microsoft Office will be able to access the operations, but without understanding the concepts they won’t be able to take advantage of what protection they offer.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKSCPRO2.RVW   20121122

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Password reset questions

Recently therewas some discussion about “self-service” password resets.  The standard option, of course, is to have some sort of “secret question” that the true account holder should be able to answer.  You know: super-secret stuff like your pet’s name.  (Yes, Paris Hilton, I’m talking about you.)

The discussion was more detailed, turning to policy and options, and asked whether you should turn off “custom” questions, and stick to a list of prepared questions.

I would definitely allow custom questions.  The standard lists never seem to give me options that I can both a) remember, and b) that wouldn’t be immediately obvious to anyone who was able to find out some minimal information about me.

If I can make up my own question, I can ask myself what my favourite burial option would be.  The answer, “encryption,” is something I will remember to my dying day, and nobody else is ever going to guess.  (Well, those who have read the “Dictionary of Information Security” might guess that one, so I guess I won’t actually use it.)

Go ahead: try and guess what is the only pain reliever that works for me.

What sits under my desk and keeps the computers running in the case of a power failure?

What is Gloria’s favourite ice cream flavour?

Finish the following sentence: Don’t treat Rob as your _______ ___.  (This is a two-factor authentication: you also have to fill in the standard response to that statement.)

The thing is, all of these oddball questions have special meaning for Gloria and I, but for very few other people in the world.  They rely on mistakes or quirks that have become “family phrases.”  For example, what do you need before bed to get to sleep?  Answer: “warum melek,” coming from an elderly lady of our acquaintance from a northern European background.

Yeah, I like “custom questions” a lot.

(OK, yes, you do have to do a bit of security awareness training to indicate that “who is my sweetie poo” may not be as secret as some people seem to think …)

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S. Korea Cyber Attack Crashes Navigation Devices. Time to fuzz your GPS?

South Korea suffered a major cyber attack yesterday. The origin of the attack seems to be China at the moment, but that is far from being definite.

I happened to be in one of the (several) cyber security operation centers, by pure coincidence. I had a chance to see events unravel in real time. Several banks have been hit (including the very large shinhan bank) and a few broadcasting channels.

The damage is hard to assess, since it’s now in everyone’s advantage to blame the cyber attack on anything from a system crash to the coffee machine running out of capsules. Budget and political moves will dominate most of the data that will be released in the next few days.
It’s clear, however, that the damage substantial. I reached out to a few friends in technical positions at various MSPs and most had a sleepless night. They’ve been hit hard.

The most interesting part of this incident, in my opinion, was a report on car GPS crashing while the attack was taking place. I haven’t seen a news report about that yet, and I couldn’t personally verify it (as I mentioned, I was stationary at the time, watching the frantic cyber-security team getting a handle on a difficult situation) but this is making rounds in security forums and a couple of friends confirmed to me that their car navigation system crashed and had to be restarted, at the exact time the attack was taking place.

The most likely explanation is that the broadcasting companies, who send TPEG data to the GPS devices (almost every car in Korea has a GPS device, almost all get real-time updates via TPEG), had sent malformed data which caused the devices to crash. This data could have been just a result of a domino effect from the networks crashing, or it could have been a very sophisticated proof-of-concept by the attacker to see if they can create a distruption. Traffic in Seoul is bad even on a normal day; without GPS devices it can be a nightmare.

Which brings up an interesting point about fuzzing network devices. TPEG fuzzers have been available for a while now (beSTORM has a TPEG module, and you can easily write your own TPEG fuzzer). The difficult part is getting the GPS device to communicate with the fuzzing generator; this is something the GPS developer can do (but probably won’t) but it is also possible for a government entity to do the necessary configuration to make that happen, given the proper resources or simply by forcing the vendors to cooperate.

The choice of the attacker to bring down the broadcasting networks might be deliberate: other than knocking TV and radio off the air (an obvious advantage in a pre-attack strike) the broadcasting networks control many devices who rely on their data. Forcing them to send malformed data to crash a variety of devices can have interesting implications. If I was a little more naive, I would predict that this will push governments around the world to focus more on fuzzing to discover these kind of vulnerabilities before they see their adversaries exploit them. But in the world we live in, they will instead throw around the phrase “APT” and buy more “APT detection products” (an oximoron if I’ve ever heard one). Thank god for APT, the greatest job saving invention since bloodletting.

An detailed analysis of the attack here:

http://training.nshc.net/KOR/Document/virus/20130321_320CyberTerrorIncidentResponseReportbyRedAlert(EN).pdf

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