REVIEW: “Making, Breaking Codes: An Introduction to Cryptology”, Paul Garrett

BKMABRCO.RVW   20101128

“Making, Breaking Codes: An Introduction to Cryptology”, Paul Garrett, 2001, 978-0-13-030369-1
%A   Paul Garrett Garrett@math.umn.edu Paul.Garrett@acm.org
%C   One Lake St., Upper Saddle River, NJ   07458
%D   2001
%G   978-0-13-030369-1 0-13-030369-0
%I   Prentice Hall
%O   800-576-3800 416-293-3621 +1-201-236-7139 fax: +1-201-236-7131
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130303690/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130303690/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130303690/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience a- Tech 2 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   523 p.
%T   “Making, Breaking Codes: An Introduction to Cryptology”

The preface states that this book is intended to address modern ideas in cryptology, with an emphasis on the mathematics involved, particularly number theory.  It is seen as a text for a two term course, possibly in cryptology, or possibly in number theory itself.  There is a brief introduction, listing terms related to cryptology and some aspects of computing.

Chapter one describes simple substitution ciphers and the one time pad.  The relevance to the process of the sections dealing with mathematics is not fully explained (and neither is the affine cipher).  Probability is introduced in chapter two, and there is some discussion of the statistics of the English language, and letter frequency attacks on simple ciphers.  This simple frequency attack is extended to substitution ciphers with permuted (or scrambled, but still monoalphabetic) ciphers, in chapter three.  There is also mention of basic character permutation ciphers and multiple anagramming attacks.  Chapter four looks at polyalphabetic ciphers and attacks on expected patterns.  More probability theory is added in chapter five.

Chapter six turns to modern symmetric ciphers, providing details of the DES (Data Encryption Standard) as examples of the principles of confusion, diffusion, and avalanche.  Divisibility is important not only to the RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adlemen) algorithm, but, in modular arithmetic, to modern cryptography as a whole, and so gets extensive treatment in chapter seven.  The Hill cipher is used, in chapter eight, to demonstrate that simple diffusion is not sufficient protection.  Complexity theory is examined, in chapter nine, with a view to determining the work factor (and sometimes practicality) of a given cryptographic algorithm.

Chapter ten turns to public-key, or asymmetric, algorithms, detailing aspects of the RSA and Diffie-Hellman algorithms, along with a number of others.  Prime numbers (important to RSA) and their characteristics are examined in chapter eleven, and roots in twelve and thirteen.  Multiplicativity, and its weak form, are addressed in fourteen, and quadratic reciprocity (for quick primality estimates) in fifteen.  Chapter sixteen notes pseudoprimes, which can complicate the search for keys.  Basic group theory, covered in chapter seventeen, relates to Diffie-Hellman and a variety of other algorithms.  Diffie-Hellman, along with some abstract algorithms, is reviewed in chapter eighteen.  Rings and fields (in groups) are noted in chapter nineteen, and cyclotomic polynomials in twenty.

Chapter twenty-one examines a few pseudo-random number generation algorithms.  More group theory is presented in twenty-two.  Chapter twenty-three looks at proofs of pseudoprimality.  Factorization attacks are addressed in basic (chapter twenty-four), and more sophisticated forms (twenty-five).  Finite fields are addressed in chapter twenty-six and discrete logarithms in twenty-seven.  Some aspects of elliptic curves are reviewed in chapter twenty-eight.  More material on finite fields is presented in chapter twenty-nine.

Despite the title, this is a math textbook.  You will need to have, at the very least, a solid introduction to number theory to get the benefit from it.  Even at that, the application, and implications, of the mathematical material to cryptology is difficult to follow.  The organization probably also works best in a math course: it certainly seems to skip around in a disjointed manner when trying to follow the crypto thread, and apply the math to it.  For all its faults, “Applied Cryptography” (cf. BKAPCRYP.RVW) is still far superior in explaining what the math actually does.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKMABRCO.RVW   20101128

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“Extrusion Detection”, Richard Bejtlich

BKEXTDET.RVW   20101023

“Extrusion Detection”, Richard Bejtlich, 2006, 0-321-34996-2,
U$49.99/C$69.99
%A   Richard Bejtlich www.taosecurity.com taosecurity.blogspot.com
%C   P.O. Box 520, 26 Prince Andrew Place, Don Mills, Ontario  M3C 2T8
%D   2006
%G   0-321-34996-2
%I   Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
%O   U$49.99/C$69.99 416-447-5101 800-822-6339 bkexpress@aw.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321349962/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience a+ Tech 3 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   385 p.
%T   “Extrusion Detection:Security Monitoring for Internal Intrusions”

According to the preface, this book explains the use of extrusion detection (related to egress scanning), to detect intruders who are using client-side attacks to enter or work within your network.   The audience is intended to be architects, engineers, analysts, operators and managers with an intermediate to advanced knowledge of network security.  Background for readers should include knowledge of scripting, network attack tools and controls, basic system administration, TCP/IP, as well as management and policy.  (It should also be understood that those who will get the most out of the text should know not only the concepts of TCP/IP, but advanced level details of packet and log structures.)  Bejtlich notes that he is not explicitly addressing malware or phishing, and provides references for those areas.  (It appears that the work is not directed at information which might detect insider attacks.)

Part one is about detecting and controlling intrusions.  Chapter one reviews network security monitoring, with a basic introduction to security (brief but clear), and then gives an overview of monitoring and listing of some tools.  Defensible network architecture, in chapter two, provides lucid explanations of the basics, but the later sections delve deeply into packets, scripts and configurations.  Managers will understand the fundmental points being made, but pages of the material will be impenetrable unless you have serious hands-on experience with traffic analysis.  Extrusion detection itself is illustrated with intelligible concepts and examples (and a useful survey of the literature) in chapter three.   Chapter four examines both hardware and software instruments for viewing enterprise network traffic.  Useful but limited instances of layer three network access controls are reviewed in chapter five.

Part two addresses network security operations.  Chapter six delves into traffic threat assessment, and, oddly, at this point explains the details of logs, packets, and sessions clearly and in more detail.   A decent outline of the advance planning and basic concepts necessary for network incident response is detailed in chapter seven (although the material is generic and has limited relation to the rest of the content of the book).  Network forensics gets an excellent overview in chapter eight: not just technical points, but stressing the importance of documentation and transparent procedures.

Part three turns to internal intrusions.  Chapter nine is a case study of a traffic threat assessment.  It is, somewhat of necessity, dependent upon detailed examination of logs, but the material demands an advanced background in packet analysis.  The (somewhat outdated) use of IRC channels in botnet command and control is reviewed in chapter ten.

Bejtlich’s prose is clear, informative, and even has touches of humour.  The content is well-organized.  (There is a tendency to use idiosyncratic acronyms, sometimes before they’ve been expanded or defined.)  This work is demanding, particularly for those still at the intermediate level, but does examine an area of security which does not get sufficient attention.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKEXTDET.RVW   20101023

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REVIEW: “Inside Cyber Warfare”, Jeffrey Carr

BKCYWRFR.RVW   20101204

“Inside Cyber Warfare”, Jeffrey Carr, 2010, 978-0-596-80215-8,
U$39.99/C$49.99
%A   Jeffrey Carr greylogic.us
%C   103 Morris Street, Suite A, Sebastopol, CA   95472
%D   2010
%G   978-0-596-80215-8 0-596-80215-3
%I   O’Reilly & Associates, Inc.
%O   U$39.99/C$49.99 800-998-9938 fax: 707-829-0104 nuts@ora.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802153/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802153/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802153/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   212 p.
%T   “Inside Cyber Warfare: Mapping the Cyber Underworld”

The preface states that this text is an attempt to cover the very broad topic of cyber warfare with enough depth to be interesting without being technically challenging for the reader.

Chapter one provides examples of cyber attacks (mostly DDoS [Distributed Denial of Service]), and speculations about future offensives.  More detailed stories are given in chapter two, although the reason for the title of “Rise of the Non-State Hacker” isn’t really clear.  The legal status of cyber warfare, in chapter three, deals primarily with disagreements about military treaties.  A guest chapter (four) gives a solid argument for the use of “active defence” (striking back at an attacker) in cyber attacks perceived to be acts of war, based on international law in regard to warfare.  The author of the book is the founder of Project Grey Goose, and chapter five talks briefly about some of the events PGG investigated, using them to illustrate aspects of the intelligence component of cyber warfare (and noting some policy weaknesses, such as the difficulties of obtaining the services of US citizens of foreign birth).  The social Web is examined in chapter six, noting relative usage in Russia, China, and the middle east, along with use and misuse by military personnel.  (The Croll social engineering attack, and Russian scripted attack tools, are also detailed.)  Ownership links, and domain registrations, are examined in chapter seven, although in a restricted scope.  Some structures of systems supporting organized crime online are noted in chapter eight.  Chapter nine provides a limited look at the sources of information used to determine who might be behind an attack.  A grab bag of aspects of malware and social networks is compiled to form chapter ten.  Chapter eleven lists position papers on the use of cyber warfare from various military services.  Chapter twelve is another guest article, looking at options for early warning systems to detect a cyber attack.  A host of guest opinions on cyber warfare are presented in chapter thirteen.

Carr is obviously, and probably legitimately, concerned that he not disclose information of a sensitive nature that is detrimental to the operations of the people with whom he works.  (Somewhat ironically, I reviewed this work while the Wikileaks furor over diplomatic cables was being discussed.)  However, he appears to have gone too far.  The result is uninteresting for anyone who has any background in cybercrime or related areas.  Those who have little to no exposure to security discussions on this scale may find it surprising, but professionals will have little to learn, here.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKCYWRFR.RVW   20101204

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REVIEW: “Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing”, Martin Gardner

BKCOCISW.RVW   20101229

“Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing”, Martin Gardner, 1972,
0-486-24761-9, U$4.95/C$7.50
%A   Martin Gardner
%C   31 East 2nd St., Mineola, NY  11501
%D   1972
%G   0-486-24761-9
%I   Dover Publications
%O   U$4.95/C$7.50 www.DoverPublications.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486247619/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486247619/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486247619/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   96 p.
%T   “Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing”

This brief pamphlet outlines some of the simple permutation and substitution ciphers that have been used over time.  The emphasis is on the clever little tricks that go into making ciphers slightly harder to crack.  None of the algorithms are terribly sophisticated, and exercises are given at the end of each chapter.  Instructions are given for decrypting some of the ciphers, even if you don’t know the key.

Two additional chapters address related topics.  The first deals with various forms of secret writing, such as invisible inks, or steganographic messages.  The last chapter briefly examines the problem of creating messages that unknown people, with unknown languages, may be able to solve (such as sending messages to the stars).

None of the material is strenuous, but this may be a nice start before moving on to a work such as Gaines “Cryptanalysis” (cf. BKCRPTAN.RVW).

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKCOCISW.RVW   20101229

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REVIEW: “Computer Viruses and Other Malicious Software”, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development

BKCVAOMS.RVW   20100607

“Computer Viruses and Other Malicious Software”, Organization for
Economic Co-operation and Development, 2009, 978-92-64-05650-3
%A   Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development
%C   2 rue Andre Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France
%D   2009
%G   978-92-64-05650-3 92-64-05650-5
%I   OECD Publishing
%O   oecdna@turpin-distribution.com sourceoecd@oecd.org
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/9264056505/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/9264056505/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/9264056505/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   244 p.
%T   “Computer Viruses and Other Malicious Software”

The executive summary doesn’t tell us much except that malware is bad, and that this report is seen as a first step in addressing the issue in a global, comprehensive manner.

Part one, entitled “The Scope of Malware,” is intended to provide background to the problem.  Chapter one, as an overview, is a random collection of technical issues, with poor explanations.  Although it is good to see that the malware situation is defined in terms that are more up-to-date than those in all too many security texts, the lack of foundational material provided by the authors will necessarily limit the perception of the issue for those readers who have not done serious research themselves.  Various stories of attacks and payloads (not all related to malware) are listed in an equally disjointed manner in chapter two.  There are numerous errors, including in simple aspects like arithmetic.  (20 million is not “5 times” one million.)   The explanation of why we should be concerned, in chapter three, boils down to the fact that the net is important, and malware imposes costs.

Part two turns to the economics of malware.  Chapter four, while it promises to deal with cybersecurity and economic incentives, merely states that security is hard.  Chapter five does deal with economic factors influencing decisions of key players on the Internet, but does so only on the basis of an opinion survey, rather than any measured costs or benefits.  Descriptions of different types of economic situations are given in chapter six, but a final set of “findings” doesn’t seem to have much background support.

Part three is supposed to contain recommendations about actions to take, or policies to follow, to address the malware issue.

Unfortunately, this work does not have sufficient technical depth on areas of malware to contribute to the literature.  The concept of addressing the economic aspects is interesting, but is not sufficiently fulfilled.  Overall, this text has nothing to add to existing information.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2010     BKCVAOMS.RVW   20100607

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What was your favorite book of 2010?

Wanting something good to read, I found myself reading “Neuromancer” again, probably for the hundredth time now.

Looking around for recommendation for new books in the usual places like “NYT Best Sellers list” turned up fairly dull results. So given that the crowd that reads this blog probably shares the same preferences as me, what book did you enjoy this past year? Any genre.

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REVIEW: “Land the Tech Job You Love”, Andy Lester

BKLTTJYL.RVW   20091207

“Land the Tech Job You Love”, Andy Lester, 2009, 978-1-934356-26-5, U$23.95/C$29.95
%A   Andy Lester andy@theworkinggeek.com
%C   Raleigh, NC
%D   2009
%G   978-1-934356-26-5 1-934356-26-3
%I   Pragmatic Bookshelf
%O   U$23.95/C$29.95 praglife.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1934356263/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1934356263/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1934356263/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   252 p.
%T   “Land the Tech Job You Love”

It’s a bit hard to keep faith in the instructions contained in a book that starts out, not just on the first page, but inside the print cover, with “Question everything, including this book.”

There is a section, in the introduction, entitled “How This Book Was Born.”  It seems that two guys who hired people started giving talks on how to apply for a job.  (It strikes me, anyway, that this might be rather akin to having a toddler write a book on what to feed children.)  Why this one wrote the book is unclear.

Part one is about the job search.  Chapter one says that you should be honest, in order not to get the wrong job by misrepresenting yourself, but spin yourself in the best possible light.  (How to balance these somewhat contradictory positions is not specified.)   Assessing your wants, needs, and motivation is dealt with in chapter two.  Creating the content of your resume in the most promotional way is covered in chapter three.  Style is substance, says chapter four, and, regardless of what is important to you, follow the tips on fonts and paper colour.  Unsurprisingly, chapter five notes that you should research the job and the company, and use contacts to search for jobs.  Target your resume and cover letter, is the advice in chapter six.

Part two deals with the interview, and subsequently.  Chapter seven says to prepare for the interview.  Eight covers interview basics.  Stock answers to stock “tough” interview questions are given in chapter nine.  Chapter ten notes topics that cannot be discussed in
job interviews in the US.  Post-interview follow-up, reference submission, and accepting or declining a job offer are examined in chapter eleven.  Chapter twelve discusses strategic (social or professional) networking, training, and long term preparation for all of the activities in part one, for the inevitable next time around.

Some appendices cover things you shouldn’t do: cliched phrases in A, resume and letter constructions in B, and interview presentations in C.

The content and advice in this book are quite standard.  If you are looking for a job in Web administration, page creation, or sales, and are new to the applications and interview process, it will probably be useful.  In terms of landing a job you love, probably the main thrust of chapter one is the most significant: be honest, and you’re less likely to become stuck in a job you don’t fancy.  (There is, of course, no guarantee that the job you love actually exists …)

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKLTTJYL.RVW   20091207

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REVIEW: “The Myths of Security”, John Viega

BKMTHSEC.RVW   20091221

“The Myths of Security”, John Viega, 2009, 978-0-596-52302-2, U$29.99/C$37.99
%A   John Viega viega@list.org
%C   103 Morris Street, Suite A, Sebastopol, CA   95472
%D   2009
%G   978-0-596-52302-2 0-596-52302-5
%I   O’Reilly & Associates, Inc.
%O   U$29.99/C$37.99 800-998-9938 fax: 707-829-0104 nuts@ora.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596523025/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596523025/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596523025/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   238 p.
%T   “The Myths of Security”

The foreword states that McAfee does a much, much better job of security than other companies.  The preface states that computer security is difficult, that people, particularly computer users, are uninformed about computer security, and that McAfee does a much better job of security than other companies.  The author also notes that it is much more fun to write a book that is simply a collection of your opinions than one which requires work and technical accuracy.

The are forty-eight “chapters” in the book, most only two or three pages long.  As you read through them, you will start to notice that they are not about information security in general, but concentrate very heavily on the antivirus (AV) field.

After an initial point that most technology has a poor user interface, a few more essays list some online dangers.  Viega goes on to note a number of security tools which he does not use, himself.  He then argues unconvincingly that free antivirus software is not a good
thing, unclearly that Google is evil, and incompletely that AV software doesn’t work.  (I’ve been working in the antivirus research field for a lot longer than the author, and I’m certainly very aware that there are problems with all forms of AV: but there are more forms of AV in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in his philosophy.  By the way, John, Fred Cohen listed all the major forms of AV technology more than twenty-*five* years ago.)  The author subsequently jumps from this careless technical assessment to a very deeply technical discussion of the type of hashing or searching algorithms that AV companies should be using.  And thence to semi-technical (but highly opinionated) pieces on how disclosure, or HTTPS, or CAPTCHA, or VPNs have potential problems and therefore should be destroyed.  Eventually all pretence at analysis runs out, and some of the items dwindle down to three or four paragraphs of feelings.

For those with extensive backgrounds in the security field, this work might have value.  Not that you’ll learn anything, but that the biases presented may run counter to your own, and provide a foil to test your own positions.  However, those who are not professionals in the field might be well to avoid it, lest they become mythinformed.

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKMTHSEC.RVW   20091221

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REVIEW: “The Design of Rijndael”, Joan Daemen/Vincent Rijmen

BKDRJNDL.RVW   20091129

“The Design of Rijndael”, Joan Daemen/Vincent Rijmen, 2002, 3-540-42580-2
%A   Joan Daemen
%A   Vincent Rijmen
%C   233 Spring St., New York, NY   10013
%D   2002
%G   3-540-42580-2
%I   Springer-Verlag
%O   212-460-1500 800-777-4643 service-ny@springer-sbm.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3540425802/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3540425802/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3540425802/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience s- Tech 3 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   238 p.
%T   “The Design of Rijndael: AES – The Advanced Encryption Standard”

This book, written by the authors of the Rijndael encryption algorithm, (the engine underlying the Advanced Encryption Standard) explains how Rijndael works, discusses some implementation factors, and presents the approach to its design.  Daemen and Rijmen note the linear and differential cryptanalytic attacks to which DES (the Data Encryption Standard) was subject, the design strategy that resulted from their analysis, the possibilities of reduce round attacks, and the details of related ciphers.

Chapter one is a history of the AES assessment and decision process.  It is interesting to note the requirements specified, particularly the fact that AES was intended to protect “sensitive but unclassified” material.  Background in regard to mathematical and block cipher concepts is given in chapter two.  The specifications of Rijndael sub-functions and rounds are detailed in chapter three.  Chapter four notes implementation considerations in small platforms and dedicated hardware.  The design philosophy underlying the work is outlined in chapter five: much of it concentrates on simplicity and symmetry.
Differential and linear cryptanalysis mounted against DES is examined in chapter six.  Chapter seven reviews the use of correlation matrices in cryptanalysis.  If differences between pairs of plaintext can be calculated as they propagate through the boolean functions used for intermediate and resultant ciphertext, then chapter eight shows how this can be used as the basis of differential cryptanalysis.  Using the concepts from these two chapters, chapter nine examines how the wide trail design diffuses cipher operations and data to prevent strong linear correlations or differential propagation.  There is also formal proof of Rijndael’s resistant construction.  Chapter ten looks at a number of cryptanalytic attacks and problems (including the infamous weak and semi-weak keys of DES) and notes the protections provided in the design of Rijndael.  Cryptographic algorithms that made a contribution to, or are descended from, Rijndael are described in chapter eleven.

This book is intended for serious students of cryptographic algorithm design: it is highly demanding text, and requires a background in the formal study of number theory and logic.  Given that, it does provide some fascinating examination of both the advanced cryptanalytic attacks, and the design of algorithms to resist them.

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKDRJNDL.RVW   20091129

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REVIEW: “Enterprise Architecture Using the Zachman Framework”, Carol O’Rourke/Neal Fishman/Warren Selkow

BKEAUTZF.RVW   20091107

“Enterprise Architecture Using the Zachman Framework”, Carol O’Rourke/Neal Fishman/Warren Selkow, 2003, 0-619-06446-3
%A   Carol O’Rourke carol@eabook.info
%A   Neal Fishman neal@eabook.info
%A   Warren Selkow warren@eabook.info
%C   25 Thomson Place, Boston, MA   02210
%D   2003
%G   0-619-06446-3
%I   Thomson Learning Inc.
%O   www.course.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0619064463/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0619064463/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0619064463/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   716 p. + CD-ROM
%T   “Enterprise Architecture Using the Zachman Framework”

The preface states that this is a text for various courses in business management and information systems, and a guide for business and education professionals.  There is also a quick and dirty introduction to the framework, mentioning the perspectives (rows of the framework) and aspects (columns), but not describing what they are.  (For those who want to understand the framework itself, the book does provide, as an appendix, Zachman’s original paper from the “IBM Systems Journal.”  It is clearer and gives a much better idea of the intent and use of the framework.  For those who have not used it before, the framework is a two-dimensional breakdown model, with the stages of project
management as the vertical axis, and the W5+H interrogatives [what, how, where, who, when, and why] as the columns, also labelled data, function, network, people, time, and motivation.)

Part one of the book, consisting only of chapter one, supposedly provides the reasons for the framework.  This consists of another brief outline, and a great deal of promotional material.  “Examples,” ranging from the alphabet to religion purport to illustrate the
structure, but are, instead, confusing and distracting.  The sporadic outbursts of humour also divert attention from the central themes, rather than supporting them.

Part two outlines the organization of the Zachman Framework’s rows, or perspectives.  Chapter two examines the concept (which may also be referred to in different versions of the Zachman model as scope or context) or planning stage, and the six examples follow the interrogative aspects.  The owner (aka business model/concept) or requirements phase is dealt with in chapter three, but the generic material on business, and shorter case studies on the topic, are not as clear in terms of the framework.  Things become even more confusing in chapter four, where the idea of the design phase (system
model/logical) is surrounded by miscellaneous examples seemingly related to psychology.  Stories that appear to be even more randomly chosen comprise the content on the builder (technology model/physical) or implementation stage, in chapter five.  Chapter six is entitled “Systems Development,” which deals with the subcontractor (detailed representations/out-of-context) or implementation stage.  Although there are interesting points about management, the material is, again, unstructured and confusing.

Chapter seven finally attempts to describe the framework in detail and context, and to provide a rationale for using it.

Part three consists of chapter eight, ostensibly about implementing (I suppose this means using) the framework.  There are lots of management tips and points, but no real structure, or indication of how the framework is to be applied.  (There is also an apparent attempt to add a third dimension to the Zachman grid, but this is not defined.)

If you want to get a good idea of the Zachman framework, you are probably best to go to Zachman’s original paper.  The intent and structure of the Zachman’s article, and the explanation of the model, is much clearer than this mass of verbiage and examples.  As noted, the paper is available as appendix E, but it is also available on the Internet, such as at
http://www.zachmaninternational.com/images/stories/ibmsj2603e.pdf

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKEAUTZF.RVW   20091107

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REVIEW: “SSL and TLS: Theory and Practice”, Rolf Oppliger

BKSSLTTP.RVW   20091129

“SSL and TLS: Theory and Practice”, Rolf Oppliger, 2009, 978-1-59693-447-4
%A   Rolf Oppliger rolf.oppliger@esecurity.ch
%C   685 Canton St., Norwood, MA   02062
%D   2009
%G   978-1-59693-447-4 1-59693-447-6
%I   Artech House/Horizon
%O   617-769-9750 800-225-9977 artech@artech-house.com
%O   http://books.esecurity.ch/ssltls.html
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1596934476/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1596934476/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1596934476/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i+ Tech 3 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   257 p.
%T   “SSL and TLS: Theory and Practice”

The preface states that the book is intended to update the existing literature on SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and TLS (Transport Layer Security), and to provide a design level understanding of the protocols.  (Oppliger does not address issues of implementation or specific products.)  The work assumes a basic understanding of TCP/IP, the Internet standards process, and cryptography, altough some fundamental cryptographic principles are given.

Chapter one is a basic introduction to security and some related concepts.  The author uses the definition of security architecture from RFC 2828 to provide a useful starting point and analogy.  The five security services listed in ISO 7498-2 and X.800 (authentication, access control, confidentiality, integrity, and nonrepudiation) are clearly defined, and the resultant specific and pervasive security mechanisms are mentioned.  In chapter two, Oppliger gives a brief overview of a number of cryptologic terms and concepts, but some (such as steganography) may not be relevant to examination of the SSL and TLS protocols.  (There is also a slight conflict: in chapter one, a secure system is defined as one that is proof against a specific and defined threat, whereas, in chapter two, this is seen as conditional security.)  The author’s commentary is, as in all his works, clear and insightful, but the cryptographic theory provided does go well beyond what is required for this topic.

Chapter three, although entitled “Transport Layer Security,” is basically a history of both SSL and TLS.  SSL is examined in terms of the protocols, structures, and messages, in chapter four.  There is also a quick analysis of the structural strength of the specification.
Since TLS is derived from SSL, the material in chapter five concentrates on the differences between SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0, and then looks at algorithmic options for TLS 1.1 and 1.2.  DTLS (Datagram Transport Layer Security), for UDP (User Datagram Protocol), is described briefly in chapter six, and seems to simply add sequence numbers to UDP, with some additional provision for security cookie exchanges.  Chapter seven notes the use of SSL for VPN (virtual private network) tunneling.  Chapter eight reviews some aspects of
public key certificates, but provides little background for full implementation of PKI (Public Key Infrastructure).  As a finishing touch, chapter nine notes the sidejacking attacks, concerns about man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks (quite germane, at the moment), and notes that we should move from certificate based PKI to a trust and privilege management infrastructure (PMI).

In relatively few pages, Oppliger has provided background, introduction, and technical details of the SSL and TLS variants you are likely to encounter.  The material is clear, well structured, and easily accessible.  He has definitely enhanced the literature, not only of TLS, but also of security in general.

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKSSLTTP.RVW   20091129

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REVIEW: “Cloud Security and Privacy”, Tim Mather/Subra Kumaraswamy/Shahed Latif

BKCLSEPR.RVW   20091113

“Cloud Security and Privacy”, Tim Mather/Subra Kumaraswamy/Shahed Latif, 2009, 978-0-596-802769, U$34.99/C$43.99
%A   Tim Mather
%A   Subra Kumaraswamy
%A   Shahed Latif
%C   103 Morris Street, Suite A, Sebastopol, CA   95472
%D   2009
%G   978-0-596-802769 0-596-802765
%I   O’Reilly & Associates, Inc.
%O   U$34.99/C$43.99 800-998-9938 707-829-0515 nuts@ora.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802765/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802765/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596802765/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   312 p.
%T   “Cloud Security and Privacy”

The preface tells how the authors met, and that they were interested in writing a book on clouds and security.  It provides no definition of cloud computing.  (It also emphasizes an interest in being “first to market” with a work on this topic.)

Chapter one is supposed to be an introduction.  It is very brief, and, yet again, doesn’t say what a cloud is.  (The authors aren’t very careful about building background information: the acronym SPI is widely used and important to the book, but is used before it is defined.  It stands for Saas/Paas/Iaas, or software-as-a-service, platform-as-a-service, and infrastructure-as-a-service.  More simply, this refers to applications, management/development utilities, and storage.)  A delineation of cloud computing is finally given in chapter two, stating that it is characterized by multitenancy, scalability, elasticity, pay-as-you-go options, and self-provisioning.  (As these aspects are expanded, it becomes clear that the scalability, elasticity, and self-provisioning characteristics the authors describe are essentially the same thing: the ability of the user or client to manage the increase or decrease in services used.)  The fact that the authors do not define the term “cloud” becomes important as the guide starts to examine security considerations.  Interoperability is listed as a benefit of the cloud, whereas one of the risks is identified as
vendor lock-in: these two factors are inherently mutually exclusive.

Chapter three talks about infrastructure security, but the advice seems to reduce to a recommendation to review the security of the individual components, including Saas, Paas, and network elements, which seems to ignore the emergent risks arising from any complex environment.  Encryption is said to be only a small part of data security in storage, as addressed in chapter four, but most of the material discusses encryption.  The deliberation on cryptography is superficial: the authors have managed to include the very recent research on homomorphic encryption, and note that the field will advance rapidly, but do not mention that homomorphic encryption is only useful for a very specific subset of data representations.  The identity management problem is outlined in chapter five, and protocols for managing new systems are reviewed, but the issue of integrating these protocols with existing systems is not.  “Security management in the Cloud,” as examined in chapter six, is a melange of general security management and operations management, with responsibility flipping back and forth between the customer and the provider.  Chapter seven provides a very good overview of privacy, but with almost no relation to the cloud as such.  Audit and compliance standards are described in chapter eight: only one is directed at the cloud.  Various cloud service providers (CSP) are listed in chapter
nine.  The terse description of security-as-a-service (confusingly also listed as Saas), in chapter ten, is almost entirely restricted to spam and Web filtering.  The impact of the use of cloud technology is dealt with in chapter eleven.  It lists the pros and cons, but again,
some of the points are presented without noting that they are mutually exclusive.  Chapter twelve finishes off the book with a precis of the foregoing chapters.

The authors do raise a wide variety of the security problems and concerns related to cloud computing.  However, since these are the same issues that need to be examined in any information security scenario it is hard to say that any cloud-specific topics are addressed.  Stripped of excessive verbiage, the advice seems to reduce to a) know what you want, b) don’t make assumptions about what the provider provides, and c) audit the provider.

copyright Robert M. Slade, 2009    BKCLSEPR.RVW   20091113

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Book haul videos?

So, like, I’m doing my socnet research, and, like, it’s so really boring to have Mashable telling you, like, three silly ways enterprises can use social sites, and like, five ways you can clean up your Facebook profile, so you can, like, really target your “brand,” and so I come across this Time video about haul videos, which I, like, watched because I’d never heard about it, and it’s really boring until suddenly

ZOMG

I realize that I’ve been doing the book reviews all wrong all these years, and I should be doing, like, haul videos of the books!

(I have this very strange, and possibly either evil or self-destructive, urge to try it out with a couple of dozen books …)

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