REVIEW: “Rainbows End”, Vernor Vinge

BKRNBSND.RVW   20130525

“Rainbows End”, Vernor Vinge, 2006, 0-312-85684-9, U$25.95/C$34.95
%A   Vernor Vinge
%C   175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY  10010
%D   2006
%G   0-312-85684-9
%I   Tor Books/Tom Doherty Assoc.
%O   U$25.95/C$34.95 pnh@tor.com www.tor.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312856849/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312856849/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312856849/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i+ Tech 2 Writing 3 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   364 p.
%T   “Rainbows End”

It is always a pleasure to read something from Vinge.  His characters are interesting, his plots sufficiently convoluted, and his writing clear and flowing.  In addition, for the geek, his understanding of the technology is realistic and fundamental, which makes a change from so many who merely parrot jargon they do not comprehend.

Of course, this is future technology we are talking about, so none of it is (currently) real.  But it could be, without the wild flights of illogic that so abound in fiction.

In this book, we have a future with interconnectedness around the globe.  Of course, this means that there are dangers, in regard to identity and authentication.  The new technology protects against these dangers with a Secure Hardware Environment.  (Or SHE, and, since the DHS mandates that everyone must use it, does that make it SHE-who-must-be-obeyed?)

Encryption is, of course, vital to the operations, and so is used a lot, often in multiple layers.  It is probably a measure of the enjoyability of Vinge’s work that I really didn’t take note of the fact that two of the characters were named Alice and Bob.  Not, that is, until late in the volume, when the author also briefly introduces a character named Eve Mallory.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKRNBSND.RVW   20130525

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REVIEW: “Debug It: Find, Repair, and Prevent Bugs in Your Code”, Paul Butcher

BKDEBGIT.RVW   20130122

“Debug It: Find, Repair, and Prevent Bugs in Your Code”, Paul Butcher, 2009, U$34.95/C$43.95, 978-1-93435-628-9
%A   Paul Butcher paul@paulbutcher.com
%C   2831 El Dorado Pkwy, #103-381 Frisco, TX 75033
%D   2009
%G   978-1-93435-628-9 1-93435-628-X
%I   Pragmatic Bookshelf
%O   U$34.95/C$43.95 sales@pragmaticprogrammer.com 800-699-7764
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/193435628X/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/193435628X/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/193435628X/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 2 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   214 p.
%T   “Debug It: Find, Repair, and Prevent Bugs in Your Code”

The preface states that there are lots of books in the market that teach development and few that teach debugging.  (In my experience, a great many development books include debugging advice, so I’m not sure where the author’s perception comes from.)  The work is structured around a core method for debugging: reproduce, diagnose, fix, and reflect.

Part one presents the basic technique.  Chapter one repeats the description of this core method.  Chapter two encourages the reproduction of the bug.  (This can be more complex than the author lets on.  I have a netbook with some bug in the hibernation function.  Despite constant observation over a period of three and a half years, I’ve yet to find a combination of conditions that reproduces the failure, nor one that prevents it.)  Some of the suggestions given are useful, if pedestrian, while others are pretty pointless.  (Butcher does not address the rather thorny issue of using “real” data for testing.)  In terms of diagnosis, in chapter three, there is limited description of process, but lots of good tips.  The same is true of fixing, in chapter four.  (I most definitely agree with the recommendation to fix underlying causes, rather than effects.)  Reflection, the topic of chapter five, is limited to advice that the problem be considered even after you’ve fixed it.

Part two explores the larger picture.  Chapter six examines bug tracking systems, and eliciting feedback from users and support staff.  Chapter seven advises on trying to address the bugs, but concentrates on “fix early,” with little discussion of priorities or ranking systems.

Part three, entitled “Debug Fu,” turns to related and side issues.  The “Special Cases” in chapter eight seem to be fairly common: software already released, compatibility issues, and “heisenbugs” that disappear when you try to track them.  Chapter nine, on the ideal debugging environment, is about as practical as most such exercises.  “Teach Your Software to Debug Itself” in chapter ten seems confined to a few specific cases.  Chapter eleven notes some common problems in development teams and structures.

The advice in the book is good, and solid, but not surprising to anyone with experience.  Novices who have not considered debugging much will find it useful.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKDEBGIT.RVW   20130122

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REVIEW: “Intelligent Internal Control and Risk Management”, Matthew Leitch

BKIICARM.RVW   20121210

“Intelligent Internal Control and Risk Management”, Matthew Leitch, 2008, 978-0-566-08799-8, U$144.95
%A   Matthew Leitch
%C   Gower House, Croft Rd, Aldershot, Hampshire, GU11 3HR, England
%D   2008
%G   978-0-566-08799-8 0-566-08799-5
%I   Gower Publishing Limited
%O   U$114.95 www.gowerpub.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0566087995/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0566087995/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0566087995/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience i- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   253 p.
%T   “Intelligent Internal Control and Risk Management”

The introduction indicates that this book is written from the risk management perspective of the financial services industry, with a concentration on Sarbanes-Oxley, COSO, and related frameworks.  There is an implication that the emphasis is on designing new controls.

Part one, “The Bigger Picture,” provides a history of risk management and internal controls.  Chapter one asks how much improvement is possible through additional controls.  The author’s statement that “[w]hen an auditor, especially an external auditor, recommends an improvement control it is usually with little concern for the cost of implementing or operating that control [or improved value].  The auditor wants to feel `covered’ by having recommended something in the face of a risk that exists, at least in theory” is one that is familiar to anyone in the security field.  Leitch goes on to note that there is a disparity between providing real value and revenue assurance, and the intent of this work is increasing the value of business risk controls.  The benefits of trying quality management techniques, as well as those of quantitative risk management, are promoted in chapter two.   Chapter three appears to be a collection of somewhat random thoughts on risk.  Psychological factors in assessing risk, and the fact that controls have to be stark enough to make people aware of upcoming dangers, are discussed in chapter four.

Part two turns to a large set of controls, and examines when to use, and not to use, them.  Chapter five introduces the list, arrangement, and structure.  Controls that generate other controls (frequently management processes) are reviewed in chapter six.  For each control there is a title, example, statement of need, opening thesis, discussion, closing recommendation, and summary relating to other controls.  Most are one to three pages in length.  Audit and monitoring controls are dealt with in chapter seven.  Adaptation is the topic of chapter eight.  (There is a longer lead-in discussion to these controls, since, inherently, they deal with change, to which people, business, and control processes are highly resistant.)  Chapter nine notes issues of protection and reliability.  The corrective controls in chapter ten are conceptually related to those in chapter seven.

Part three looks at change for improvement, rather than just for the sake of change.  Chapter eleven suggests means of promoting good behaviours.  A Risk and Uncertainty Management Assessment (RUMA) tool is presented in chapter twelve, but, frankly, I can’t see that it goes beyond thinking out alternative courses of action.  Barriers to improvement are noted in chapter thirteen.  Roles in the organization, and their relation to risk management, are outlined in chapter fourteen.  Chapter fifteen examines the special needs for innovative projects.  Ways to address restrictive ideology are mentioned in chapter sixteen.  Seven areas that Leitch advises should be explored conclude the book in chapter seventeen.

A number of interesting ideas are presented for consideration in regard to the choice and design of controls.  However, the text is not a guidebook for producing actual control systems.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKIICARM.RVW   20121210

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REVIEW: “The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”, Michael Zalewski

BKTNGWEB.RVW   20121207

“The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”, Michael Zalewski, 2012, 978-1-59327-388-0, U$49.95/C$52.95
%A   Michael Zalewski
%C   555 De Haro Street, Suite 250, San Francisco, CA   94107
%D   2012
%G   978-1-59327-388-0 1-59327-388-6
%I   No Starch Press
%O   U$49.95/C$52.95 415-863-9900 fax 415-863-9950 info@nostarch.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1593273886/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience a Tech 2 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   299 p.
%T   “The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications”

In the preface, the author dismisses security experts as academic, ineffectually worried, and unaware of the importance of the Web.  (Zalewski makes reference to a “confused deputy problem” being “regularly” referred to in academic security literature.  I’ve never heard of it.)  He blames them for the current insecure state of Web applications.  I suspect this is a bit unfair, given the “citizen programmer” status of huge numbers of Web projects, and the time and feature pressure this places on the rest.  It is unfortunate that some security specialists have not regarded the Web as significant, but it is critical that most security specialist don’t know how to program, and most programmers don’t care anything about security.

He also says the book is about repentance, and a step towards normalcy.  (Normalcy is not defined.

Chapter one is an introduction, both to information security, and to Web application development.  Starting off by misattributing one of Gene Spafford’s quotes, the author complains about any and all attempts to structure or define security.  (Rather inconsistently, while he derides taxonomies, he does recommend designing systems so as to deal with “classes” of bugs.  The difference between a class and a taxon is not explained.)

Part one outlines the principal concepts of the Web.  Chapter two starts us off with the URL (Uniform Resource Locator), noting some of the problems with different types of encoding.  From this point in the book, each chapter concludes with a “Security Engineering Cheat Sheet,” listing potential problems, and suggesting broad approaches (without details) to dealing with those issues.  HTTP (the HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the subject of chapter three, primarily concerning the handling of user data.  (Since the author is fond of quotes, I’ll give him one from Tony Buckland, several years before the invention of the Web: “The client interface is the boundary of trustworthiness.”)  Chapters four to eight cover HTML (HyperText Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), browser scripting (concentrating exclusively on JavaScript), non-HTML data (mostly XML), and plug-ins.

Part two turns to browser security features.  Chapter nine talks about isolating content, so that different sites or documents don’t interfere with each other.  Determining where and to whom a page belongs is addressed in chapter ten.  Chapter eleven expands the details of problems caused by allowing disparate documents to interact.  Other security boundaries, such as local storage, networks, ports, and cookies, are reviewed in chapter twelve.  Recognizing content, when the “Content-Type” description may be problematic, is in chapter thirteen.  Chapter fourteen suggests ways to deal with malicious scripts.  Specifically setting or raising permissions is discussed in chapter fifteen.

Part three looks ahead to Web application security issues as they may develop in the future.  New and coming security features are noted in chapters sixteen and seventeen.  Chapter eighteen reviews the all-too-common Web vulnerabilities (such as cross-site scripting and “Referer” leakage).

Absent the complaints about the rest of the security field, this is a decent and technical guide to problems which should be considered for any Web application project.  It’s not a cookbook, but provides solid advice for designers and developers.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKTNGWEB.RVW   20121207

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REVIEW: “Consent of the Networked”, Rebecca MacKinnon

BKCNSNTW.RVW   20121205

“Consent of the Networked”, Rebecca MacKinnon, 2012, 978-0-465-02442-1, U$26.99/C$30.00
%A   Rebecca MacKinnon
%C   387 Park Ave. South, New York, NY   10016-8810
%D   2012
%G   978-0-465-02442-1 0-465-02442-1
%I   Basic Books
%O   U$26.99/C$30.00 special.markets@perseusbooks.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465024421/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465024421/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465024421/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   294 p.
%T   “Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom”

In neither the preface nor the introduction is there a clear statement of the intent of this work.  The closest comes buried towards the end of the introduction, in a sentence which states “This book is about the new realities of power, freedom, and control in the Internet Age.”  Alongside other assertions in the opening segments, one can surmise that MacKinnon is trying to point out the complexities of the use, by countries or corporations, of technologies which enhance either democracy or control, and the desirability of a vague concept which she refers to as “Internet Freedom.”

Readers may think I am opposed to the author’s ideas.  That is not the case.  However, it is very difficult to critique a text, and suggest whether it is good or bad, when there is no clear statement of intent, thesis, or terminology.

Part one is entitled “Disruptions.”  Chapter one outlines a number of stories dealing with nations or companies promising freedom, but actually censoring or taking data without informing citizens or users.  The “digital commons,” conceptually akin to open source but somewhat more nebulous (the author does, in fact, confuse open source and open systems), is promoted in chapter two.

Part two turns more directly to issues of control.  Chapter three concentrates on factors the Republic of China uses to strengthen state censorship.  Variations on this theme are mentioned in chapter four.

Part three examines challenges to democracy.  Chapter five lists recent US laws and decisions related to surveillance and repression of speech.  The tricky issue of making a distinction between repression of offensive speech on the one hand, and censorship on the other, is discussed in chapter six.  The argument made about strengthening censorship by taking actions against intellectual property infringement, in chapter seven, is weak, and particularly in light of more recent events.

Part four emphasizes the role that corporations play in aiding national censorship and surveillance activities.  Chapter eight starts with some instances of corporations aiding censorship, but devolves into a review of companies opposed to “network neutrality.”  Similarly, chapter nine notes corporations aiding surveillance.  Facebook and Google are big, states chapter ten, but the evil done in stories given does not inherently relate to size.

Part five asks what is to be done.  Trust but verify, says (ironically) chapter eleven: hold companies accountable.  MacKinnon mentions that this may be difficult.   Chapter twelve asks for an Internet Freedom Policy, but, since the author admits the term can have multiple meanings, the discussion is fuzzy.  Global Information Governance is a topic that makes chapter thirteen apposite in terms of the current ITU (International Telecommunications Union) summit, but the focus in the book is on the ICANN (Internet Committee on Assigned Names and Numbers) top level domain sale scandals.  The concluding chapter fourteen, on building a netizen-centric Internet is not just fuzzy, but full of warm fuzzies.

There are a great many interesting news reports, stories, and anecdotes in the book.  There is a great deal of passion, but not much structure.  This can make it difficult to follow topical threads.  This book really adds very little to the debates on these topics.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2013   BKCNSNTW.RVW   20121205

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REVIEW: “Cloud Crash”, Phil Edwards

BKCLDCRS.RVW   20101009

“Cloud Crash”, Phil Edwards, 2011, 978-1466408425, U$9.99
%A   Phil Edwards PhilEdwardsInc.com philipjedwards@gmail.com
%C   Seattle, WA
%D   2011
%G   978-1466408425 1466408421
%I   CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform/Amazon
%O   U$9.99
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1466408421/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1466408421/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1466408421/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n Tech 2 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   386 p.
%T   “Cloud Crash”

To a background of the Internet crashing, and opposed by a conspiracy that has penetrated the highest levels of government, two (no, make that three … err … four … better say five …) groups of individuals race to save the world from … a stock market fraud?  hostile takeover? aliens?  (No, I’m pretty sure the aliens were a red
herring.)

The story and inconsistent characterizations could use some work, and the plot twists don’t make it very easy to follow what is going on.  It’s fairly easy to tell who the good and bad guys are: the politics and philosophy of the book are fairly simple, and one is reminded of the scifi and comics of the 30s and 40s, with heavily anti-fascist and (ironically) right-wing rhetoric.

It would be tempting to dismiss the work as a simple “jump on the latest buzzword” potboiler, were it not for the fact that the technology is fairly realistic.  Yes, right now everyone is jumping on the cloud bandwagon without much regard for real security.  Yes, if you wanted to make a big (and public) splash on the Internet, without doing too much permanent damage, taking down power supplies would still leave the data intact.  (Of course, an axe would do just as good a job as bombs …)

So, while the story isn’t great, at least the technology is less annoying than is normally the case …

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKCLDCRS.RVW   20101009

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REVIEW: “Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”, Mitch Tulloch

BKSCPRO2.RVW   20121122

“Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”, Mitch Tulloch,
2012, 0735668833, U$9.99
%A   Mitch Tulloch info@mtit.com www.mtit.com
%C   1 Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA   98052-6399
%D   2012
%G   0735668833
%I   Microsoft Press
%O   U$9.99 800-MSPRESS fax: 206-936-7329 mspinput@microsoft.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735668833/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   100 p.
%T   “Security and Privacy for Microsoft Office 2010 Users”

Reducing the complex jargon in the introduction to its simplest terms, this book is intended to allow anyone who uses the Microsoft Office 2010 suite, or the online Office 365, to effectively employ the security functions built into the software.  Chapter one purports to present the “why” of security, but does a very poor job of it.  Company policy is presented as a kind of threat to the employee, and this does nothing to ameliorate the all-too-common perception that security is there simply to make life easier for the IT department, while it makes work harder for everyone else.

Chapter two examines the first security function, called “Protected View.”  The text addresses issues of whether or not you can trust a document created by someone else, and mentions trusted locations.  (Trusted locations seem simply to be defined as a specified directory on your hard drive, and the text does not discuss whether merely moving an unknown document into this directory will magically render it trustworthy.  Also, the reader is told how to set a trusted location, but not an area for designating untrusted files.)  Supposedly “Protected View” will automatically restrict access to, and danger from, documents you receive from unknown sources.  Unfortunately, having used Microsoft Office 2010 for a couple of years, and having received, in that time, hundreds of documents via email and from Web sources, I’ve never yet seen “Protected View,” so I’m not sure how far I can trust what the author is telling me.  (In addition, Tulloch’s discussion of viruses had numerous errors: Concept came along five years before Melissa, and some of the functions he attributes to Melissa are, in fact, from the CHRISTMA exec over a decade earlier.)

Preparation of policy is promised in chapter three, but this isn’t what most managers or security professionals would think of as policy: it is just the provision of a function for change detection or digital signatures.  It also becomes obvious, at this point, that Microsoft Office 2010 and Office 365 can have significantly different operations.  The material is quite confusing with references to a great many programs which are not part of the two (2010 and 365) MS Office suites.

Chapter four notes the possibility of encryption with a password, but the discussion of rights is unclear, and a number of steps are missing.

An appendix lists pointers to a number of references at Microsoft’s Website.

The utility of this work is compromised by the fact that it provides instructions for functions, but doesn’t really explain how, and in what situations, the functions can assist and protect the user.  Any employee using Microsoft Office will be able to access the operations, but without understanding the concepts they won’t be able to take advantage of what protection they offer.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKSCPRO2.RVW   20121122

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REVIEW: “World War Hack”, Ethan Bull/Tsubasa Yozora

BKWWHACK.RVW   20121009

“World War Hack”, Ethan Bull/Tsubasa Yozora, 2012, 978-0-9833670-8-6
%A   Ethan Bull
%A   Tsubasa Yozora
%C   9400 N. MacArthur Blvd., Suite 124-215, Irving, TX   75063
%D   2012
%E   Gwendolyn Borgen
%G   978-0-9833670-8-6 0-9833670-8-6
%I   Viper Entertainment Inc./Viper Comics
%O   U$7.95 wyatt@worldwarhack.com www.worldwarhack.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0983367086/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0983367086/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0983367086/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   72 p.
%T   “World War Hack”

Someone (eventually we find out they are backed by the Chinese) has hacked into the United States military and government control systems.  Fortunately, despite being in complete control and untraceable, all they seem to want to do is make one military drone act up.

The US government immediately swings into action, and sponsors a hacking contest, to try and identify suitably talented young geniuses (genii?) to find out what is going on.

It’s hard to follow what is going on, since the artwork makes it difficult to differentiate between characters.  There are young people with bad haircuts, and there are other people with suits.  Some people are female.  After that, it gets hard to tell who’s who.  One of the hackers is a government agent, another one has a criminal record but seems to be a son of a suited government agent.

Some of the technical and hacking activity is somewhat realistic, but other aspects are bizarre, and betray a complete lack of understanding of basic technology.  For example, at different times a programming language gets “hacked” (in the sense of breaking into it), and at another time a government administrator can’t tell what computer language has been used to write a specific program.  In the real world of programming and hacking neither of these scenarios makes any sense.  Absent Ken Thompson’s famous speech nobody “hacks” a language, and generally nobody cares what language has been used to write a utility once it is operating.  (By the way, no programmer ever said LISP was a concise language, and there is no way that even a “skin” on top of LISP would look like C.)  At another point two devices “piggyback” on the same IP address, which simply does not work in networking terms.

There are aspects of this story that are realistic.  One is that, if you are not careful with your systems, someone can penetrate them and mess with you.  If there are any other useful factors in this story, I can’t think of them offhand.

(As usual, the draft of this review was submitted to the author/publisher for comment prior to publication.  I often get rude email in response, sometimes threats of physical harm, and once even a death threat.  [Yes, really.]  In this case the publisher has threatened unspecified legal action “to protect the copyright on our work.”  I would be interested to see the publisher’s reaction to counsel explaining the “commentary” aspect of the concept of “fair use.”)

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKWWHACK.RVW   20121009

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Read this book. If you have anything to do with security, read this book.

I have been reviewing security books for over twenty years now.  When I think of how few are really worthwhile that gets depressing.

However, Ross Anderson is always worth reading.  And when Ross Anderson first published “Security Engineering” I was delighted to be able to tell everyone that it was a worthwhile read.  If you are, in any way, interested in, or working in, the field of security, there is something there for you.  Probably an awful lot.

When Ross Anderson made the first edition available online, for free, and then published the second edition, I was delighted to be able to tell everyone that they should buy the second edition, but, if they didn’t trust me, they should read the first edition free, and then buy the second edition because it was even better.

Now Ross has made the second edition available, online, for free.

Everyone should read it, if they haven’t already done so.

(I am eagerly awaiting the third edition  :-)

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REVIEW: Identity Theft Manual: Practical Tips, Legal Hints, and Other Secrets Revealed, Jack Nuern

BKIDTHMA.RVW   20120831

“Identity Theft Manual: Practical Tips, Legal Hints, and Other Secrets Revealed”, Jack Nuern, 2012
%A   Jack Nuern http://www.idtheftadvocates.com
%C   4901 W. 136 St., Leawood, KS, USA   66224
%D   2012
%G   ASIN: B0088IG92E
%I   Roadmap Productions
%O   fax 866-594-2771
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0088IG92E/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0088IG92E/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0088IG92E/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 1 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   128 p.
%T   “Identity Theft Manual: Practical Tips, Legal Hints, and Other Secrets Revealed”

Despite the implications of the title, this is not a primer for performing identity theft, but a guide to preventing and recovering from it.  The information, unfortunately, is fairly pedestrian, and most of it could be obtained from any magazine article on the topic.

Chapter one is a (very) basic introduction to identity theft, with a rather odd emphasis on the use of medical information.  Methods of identity theft are described in chapter two.  Unfortunately, this is where the book starts to show signs of serious disorganization, and some of the material is more sensational than helpful.  Chapter three lists some steps you can take to attempt to prevent identity theft.  The suggestions are the usual standards of not giving out any information to anyone, and the book tacitly admits that protection is not assured.

Chapter four gets to the real intent of the work: actions to take when your identity has been stolen and misused.  There is a great deal of useful content at this point, limited by two factors.  One is that everything discussed is restricted to institutions in the United States.  The other is that there is almost no discussion of what the entities mentioned can do for you or what they can’t or won’t.

As one could expect from a book written by a law firm, chapter five addresses the liability that the victim of identity theft faces.  The answer, unsurprisingly, is “it depends,” backed up with a few stories.  (Pardon me: “case studies.”)

There are some appendices (called, predictably, “Exhibits”).  Again, most of these will only be of use to those in the United States, and some, sections of related laws, will be of very little use to most.  There is a victim complaint and affidavit form which would probably be very helpful to most identity theft victims, reminding them of information to be collected and presented to firms and authorities.

The book is not particularly well written, and could certainly use some better structure and organization.  However, within its limits, it can be of use to those who are in the situation, and who frequently have nowhere to turn.  As the book notes, authorities are often unhelpful and take limited interest in identity theft cases.   And, as the book also (frequently) notes, the book is cheaper than hiring a law firm.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKIDTHMA.RVW   20120831

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Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK

Recently, on the CISSPforum, there was some discussion of the new, third edition of the Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK (which, I note, is pretending to be available as an ebook for only ten bucks).  At the end of one post, one of the correspondents stated that he was “leaning towards buying the new book.”

First, lemme say that, for those who haven’t yet got the cert, I do recommend the “Official Guide” as my first choice.  (Harris is easier to read, but does contain *lots* of errors, and I tell my seminar candidates that I refuse to answer any question that starts out “Shon Harris says …”   :-)

However, on the other hand … why would anyone who has the cert buy the guide?  Of course, I am speaking from the perspective of someone who does read the source literature (and I am aware that all too many of my colleagues do not).

I also recall at least two seminar attendees who actually did have the cert.  Furthermore, they were consultants, and thus going on their own dime for the course.  The reason given was the same: they charged by the hour, so any time spent upgrading was time they could not charge.  Therefore, regularly attending the seminar was the fastest, and therefore, in their situation cheapest, way to ensure they were current.

So, yes, I can see that some people would want to get the guide as a quick check.  (In that regard, I would tend to recommend ISMH instead of the guide, but …)  But I still find it kind of odd …

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REVIEW: “The Quantum Thief”, Hannu Rajaniemi

BKQNTTHF.RVW   20120724

“The Quantum Thief”, Hannu Rajaniemi, 2010, 978-1-4104-3970-3
%A   Hannu Rajaniemi
%C   175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY  10010
%D   2010
%G   978-1-4104-3970-3 0765367661
%I   Tor Books/Tom Doherty Assoc.
%O   pnh@tor.com www.tor.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0765367661/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0765367661/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0765367661/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   466 p.
%T   “The Quantum Thief”

This is the type of space opera that creates whole worlds, technologies, and languages behind it.  The language or jargon makes it hard to read.  The worlds are confusing, especially since some are real, and some aren’t.  The technologies make it way too easy to pull huge numbers of deuses ex way too many machinas, which strain the ability to follow, or even care about, the plot.  In this situation, the plot can be random, so the impetus for continued reading tends to rely on the reader’s sympathy for the characters.  Unfortunately, in this work, the characters can also have real or imagined aspects, and can change radically after an event.  It was hard to keep going.

Some of the jargon terms can be figured out fairly easily.  An agora, as it was in Greece, is a public meeting place.  Gogol wrote a book called “Dead Peasants,” so gogols are slaves.  Gevulot is the Hebrew word for borders, and has to deal with agreed-upon privacy deals.  But all of them have quirks, and a number of other terms come out of nowhere.

I was prompted to review this book since it was recommended as a piece of fiction that accurately represented some interesting aspects of information security.  Having read it, I can agree that there are some cute descriptions of significant points.  There is mention of a massive public/asymmetric key infrastructure (PKI) system.  There is reference to the importance of social engineering in breaking technical protection.  There is allusion to the increased fragility of overly complex systems.  But these are mentions only.  The asymmetric crypto system has no mention of a base algorithm, of course, but doesn’t even begin to describe the factors in the PKI itself.

If you know infosec you will recognize some of the mentions.  If you don’t, you won’t learn them.  (A specific reference to social engineering actually relates to an implementation fault.)  Otherwise, you may or may not enjoy being baffled by the pseudo-creativity of the story.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKQNTTHF.RVW   20120724

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Amazon customer service

Or: One Of The Reasons Why I’ve Never Actually Bought Any Kindle Books from Amazon, And Only Install Free Books:

Amazon closes account and wipes Kindle. Without notice. Without explanation.

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REVIEW: “Learning from the Octopus”, Rafe Sagarin

BKLNFOCT.RVW   20120714

“Learning from the Octopus”, Rafe Sagarin, 2012, 978-0-465-02183-3, U$26.99/C$30.00
%A   Rafe Sagarin
%C   387 Park Ave. South, New York, NY   10016-8810
%D   2012
%G   978-0-465-02183-3 0-465-02183-2
%I   Basic Books/Perseus Books Group
%O   U$26.99/C$30.00 800-810-4145 www.basicbooks.com
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465021832/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465021832/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465021832/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n+ Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   284 p.
%T   “Learning from the Octopus”

The subtitle promises that we will learn “how secrets from nature can help us fight terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and disease.”  The book does fulfill that aim.  However, what it doesn’t say (up front) is that it isn’t an easy task.

The overall tone of the book is almost angry, as Sagarin takes the entire security community to task for not paying sufficient attention to the lessons of biology.  The text and examples in the work, however, do not present the reader with particularly useful insights.  The prologue drives home the fact that 350 years of fighting nation-state wars did not prepare either society or the military for the guerilla-type terrorist situations current today.  No particular surprise: it has long been known that the military is always prepared to fight the previous war, not this one.

Chapter one looks to the origins of “natural” security.  In this regard, the reader is inescapably reminded of Bruce Schneier’s “Liars and Outliers” (cf. BKLRSOTL.RVW), and Schneier’s review of evolution, sociobiology, and related factors.  But whereas Schneier built a structure and framework for examining security systems, Sagarin simply retails examples and stories, with almost no structure at all.   (Sagarin does mention a potentially interesting biology/security working group, but then is strangely reticent about it.)  In chapter two, “Tide Pool Security,” we are told that the octopus is very fit and functional, and that the US military and government did not listen to biologists in World War II.

Learning is a force of nature, we are told in chapter three, but only in regard to one type of learning (and there is no mention at all of education).  The learning force that the author lauds is that of evolution, which does tend to modify behaviours for the population over time, but tends to be rather hard on individuals.  Sagarin is also opposed to “super efficiency” (and I can agree that it leaves little margin for error), but mostly tells us to be smart and adaptable, without being too specific about how to achieve that.  Chapter four tells us that decentralization is better than centralization, but it is interesting to note that one of the examples given in the text demonstrates that over-decentralization is pretty bad, too.  Chapter five again denigrates security people for not understanding biology, but that gets a bit hard to take when so much of the material betrays a lack of understanding of security.  For example, passwords do not protect against computer viruses.  As the topics flip and change it is hard to see whether there is any central thread.  It is not clear what we are supposed to learn about Mutual Assured Destruction or fiddler crabs in chapter six.

Chapter seven is about bluffing, use  and misuse of information, and alarm systems.  Yes, we already know about false positives and false negatives, but this material does not help to find a balance.  The shared values of salmon and suicide bombers, religion, bacterial addicts, and group identity are discussed in chapter eight.  Chapter nine says that cooperation can be helpful.  We are told, in chapter ten, that “natural is better,” therefore it is ironic to note that the examples seem to pit different natural systems against each other.  Also, while Sagarin says that a natural and complex system is flexible and resilient, he fails to mention that it is difficult to verify and tune.

This book is interesting, readable, erudite, and contains many interesting and thought-provoking points.  For those in security, it may be good bedtime reading material, but it won’t be helpful on the job.  In the conclusion, the author states that his goal was to develop a framework for dealing with security problems, of whatever type.  He didn’t.  (Schneier did.)

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKLNFOCT.RVW   20120714

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REVIEW: “Managing the Human Factor in Information Security”, David Lacey

BKMHFIIS.RVW   20120216

“Managing the Human Factor in Information Security”, David Lacey, 2009, 978-0-470-72199-5, U$50.00/C$55.00/UK#29.99
%A   David Lacey
%C   5353 Dundas Street West, 4th Floor, Etobicoke, ON   M9B 6H8
%D   2009
%G   978-0-470-72199-5 0-470-72199-5
%I   John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
%O   U$50.00/C$55.00/UK#29.99 416-236-4433 fax: 416-236-4448
%O  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470721995/robsladesinterne
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470721995/robsladesinte-21
%O   http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470721995/robsladesin03-20
%O   Audience n- Tech 1 Writing 2 (see revfaq.htm for explanation)
%P   374 p.
%T   “Managing the Human Factor in Information Security”

The preface states that the intent of the book is to identify and explain the range of human, organizational, and social challenges when trying to manage security in the current information and communications environment.  It is hoped this material will help manage incidents, risks, and design, and assist with promoting security systems to employees and management.  A subsidiary aim is to leverage the use of social networking.

Some aspects of security are mentioned among the indiscriminate stories in chapter one.  Chapter two has more tales, with emphasis on risks, and different people you encounter.  Generic incident response and business continuity material is in chapter three.  When you know the risk management literature, you can see where the arguments in chapter four come from.  (Yes, Donn, we know quantitative risk analysis is impossible.)  The trouble is, Lacey makes all of them, and therefore comes to no conclusion.  Chapter five has some points to make about different types of people, and dealing with them.  Unfortunately, it’s hard to extract the useful bits from the larding of stories and verbiage.  (Given the haphazard nature of the content, making practical application would be even more difficult.)  Aspects of corporate culture are discussed, in an unstructured fashion, in chapter six.  Chapter seven notes a number of factors that have appeared in successful security awareness programs, but doesn’t fulfill the promise of helping the reader design them.  Chapter eight is about changing organizational attitudes, so it’s an (equally random) extension of chapter six.  It also adds some more items on training programs.  Chapter nine is about building business cases.  Generic advice on creating systems is provided in chapter ten.  Some even broader advice on management is in chapter eleven.  A collection of some points from throughout the book forms a “conclusion.”

There are good points in the book.  There are points that would be good in one situation, and bad in another.  There is little structure in the work to help you find useful material.  There are stories about people, but not a survey of human factors.  Lacey uses lots of aphorisms throughout the text.  I am reminded of the proverb that if you can tell good advice from bad advice, you don’t need any advice.

copyright, Robert M. Slade   2012     BKMHFIIS.RVW   20120216

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Sophos Threatsaurus

http://www.sophos.com/en-us/security-news-trends/security-trends/threatsaurus.aspx

Concentrating on malware and phishing, this is a very decent guide for “average” computer users with little or no security background or knowledge.  Three sections in a kind of dictionary or encyclopedia format: malware and threats, protection technologies, and a (very brief but still useful) history of malware (1949-2012).

Available free for download, and (unlike a great many “free” downloads I could name) you don’t even have to register for endless spam from the company.

Recommended to pass around to family, friends, and your corporate security awareness department.

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