Copyright in a packet

Ahoy,
Can you tell who wrote this poem?

“Oracle
Everybody follows
Speedy bits exchange
Stars await to glow”

You’re right!
Oracle JDBC Client programmers.

I was sniffing my network and encountered this poem in the RAW bytes of one of Oracle’s JDBC logon packets.

The RAW bytes of the packet (Data is in Hex; on the right ASCII translation):

22 4f 72 “Or
61 63 6c 65 0a 45 76 65 72 79 62 6f 64 79 20 66 acle.Everybody f
6f 6c 6c 6f 77 73 0a 53 70 65 65 64 79 20 62 69 ollows.Speedy bi
74 73 20 65 78 63 68 61 6e 67 65 0a 53 74 61 72 ts exchange.Star
73 20 61 77 61 69 74 20 74 6f 20 67 6c 40 6f 77 s await to gl@ow
22 0a 54 68 65 20 70 72 65 63 65 64 69 6e 67 20 “.The preceding
6b 65 79 20 69 73 20 63 6f 70 79 72 69 67 68 74 key is copyright
65 64 20 62 79 20 4f 72 61 63 6c 65 20 43 6f 72 ed by Oracle Cor
70 6f 72 61 74 69 6f 6e 2e 0a 44 75 70 6c 40 69 poration..Dupl@i
63 61 74 69 6f 6e 20 6f 66 20 74 68 69 73 20 6b cation of this k
65 79 20 69 73 20 6e 6f 74 20 61 6c 6c 6f 77 65 ey is not allowe
64 20 77 69 74 68 6f 75 74 20 70 65 72 6d 69 73 d without permis
73 69 6f 6e 0a 66 72 6f 6d 20 4f 72 61 63 6c 31 sion.from Oracl1
65 20 43 6f 72 70 6f 72 61 74 69 6f 6e 2e 20 43 e Corporation. C
6f 70 79 72 69 67 68 74 20 32 30 30 33 20 4f 72 opyright 2003 Or
61 63 6c 65 20 43 6f 72 70 6f 72 61 74 69 6f 6e acle Corporation

As you can see – the packet, belonging to our corporate world, had a Copyright mark, just after the poem.

“The preceding key is copyrighted by Oracle Corporation.
Duplication of this key is not allowed without permission
from Oracle Corporation. Copyright 2003 Oracle Corporation”

Well, what next?.. Harry Potter on P2P packets or maybe Copyrighted MD5s?

Live long and prosper,

Kfir Damari,
kfird@beyondsecurity.com.

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  • cail

    Well, you can’t copyright a password, but what if your password happened to be an original work (i.e. a poem) you created? You retain the copyright to the work, which prevents other people from using it, which in theory would indirectly prevent other people from using the password necessary to interoperate. Determining the exact reason that phrase is present in the packet (i.e. reverse engineering the app) would probably prove or disprove this postulate.

    I’m torn on whether I feel this is clever or despicable.

  • http://www.goretsky.com/ Aryeh Goretsky

    Hello,

    Isn’t this basically the same as what Habeas does with their Sender-Warranted Email (or whatever its called) program?

    They include some X-headers with sent messages that form a haiku which looks like:

    X-Habeas-SWE-1: winter into spring
    X-Habeas-SWE-2: brightly anticipated
    X-Habeas-SWE-3: like Habeas SWE ™

    and then copyright it, since the haiku is a novel (as in new, not a book) construction. Then, all they have to do is sue anyone for copyright (or trademark?) infringment who includes their header in spam.

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky

  • Massimo

    the problem is non existing. since it’s a password, if someone else will be using it as such, they’re not going to tell anybody (hopefully) so no problems with copyrights ;-)

  • http://www.beyondsecurity.com Kfir

    Well, as a poet (write mostly for my self), I find it interesting to use poems in order to validate the copyright.
    In this case, it seems more like an Easter egg then something to do with copyright..
    I’ve changed the poem and it still works ;)