Border (relative) difficulties

I have experienced all kinds of difficulties travelling down to the US to teach.

It used to be a lot easier, in the old days.
Border agent: “Business or pleasure?”
Me: “Business.”
BA: “What are you doing?”
Me: “Teaching.”
BA: “OK.”
Then The-Conservative-Government-Before-The-New-Harperite-Government-Of-Canada decided, in it’s infinite wisdom, to bring in something called the North American Free Trade Agreement, which had provisions to make it “easier” to trade and travel.  Now it’s a royal pain.

(I’ve travelled and taught elsewhere, of course.  Some places I’ve had to get visas.  Nigeria was a nusiance.  Australia was a $20 charge, online, no problem at all.  Last time I taught in Ireland it was “Business or pleasure?”  “Business.”  “Welcome to Ireland!”  Last time I taught in Norway there wasn’t even anyone at the immigration desk.)

Occasionally Americans have complained that they have had troubles coming to work in Canada.  So far I have never heard anything like what I’ve had to go
through.

At the moment I’ve been dealing with American lawyers again.  This has generally been OK, since I usually don’t have to travel for that.  However, this time the other side wants to depose me.  (I suspect they are just doing this for the nusiance value.  As usuall, I’m not doing this as an “expert” witness, just as the only guy who still has the materials.)  So, the origianl plan was for me to fly down to California, spend a day with the lawyers on one side “prepping” me, and spend an hour or two with the other side for the deposition.  They’d have to pay for my fare and travel expenses, as well as my time during prep.

During the call I mentioned that, since he was a lawyer, and presumably had access to other lawyers in their firm who knew something about immigration, they should check on that point, and see if they wanted/needed to do anything about a visa for me.  He didn’t think it was an issue.  I said that, according to the official rules he was right, but that I had seen plenty of cases where the border agents interpretted the rules in idiosyncratic ways, and maybe he should just check.

Today the plan has entirely changed.  At least three lawyers (possibly more), from at least two firms (and possibly more) are flying up from California, renting a boardroom here in Vancouver, renting a court reporter, and staying at least two days (more likely three) to do the prep and deposition.  With all the extra associated costs.  (And all this on behalf of a company that has very stringent travel cost policies: I had to sign off on them for the original contract.)

I think I’ve proved the point: it’s *way* harder to go to the US than to Canada.

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