Ignorance as a human (business?) right?

Rogers Communications Inc. is a company providing cable, cellular, and other services in Canada.

Rogers has a discount brand, Chatr, which they advertise as being “more reliable and less prone to dropped calls.”  Canada’s Competition Bureau, after what it called “an extensive review of technical data,” found no discernible difference in dropped-call rates between Rogers/Chatr and new entrants.

Apparently, Rogers will argue that the court should strike down a section in Canada’s Competition Act that requires companies to undergo “adequate and proper” tests of a product’s performance before making advertising claims about it.  In other words, Rogers is saying that forcing the company to find out if claims are true is unfair, because that means they can’t lie with a straight face.

Q: What is the difference between a computer salesman and a used-car salesman?

A: The used-car salesman knows when he’s lying to you …

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