Transit of venus safety tip

Many people around the world are hoping for clear skies to view the transit of Venus across the face of the sun, an event which will not occur again for more than a century. [1]

However, public safety officials are concerned that people may endanger their eyes by looking directly at the sun without eye protection.  Not only will they not be able to see any indications of the transit, but this can, of course, burn the retina of the eye, causing permanent damage, and possibly complete blindness.

However, I have confirmed that ordinary sunglasses are sufficient protection, as long as used correctly. [2]

And the great thing is, this works no matter what “Venus transit” webcam you view, and no matter how brightly you have your monitor cranked up.

(In the spring, generally we would have at least some clear skies for viewing.  However, typically Vancouver, it’s pretty much completely overcast here for the entire run of the transit.)

So, thank goodness for NASA

[1] It’s rather interesting that the transits occur in pairs, eight years apart, and then more than a century between the eight year pairs.

[2] I hope I don’t have to point out that this is just a joke, and that staring into the sun with only sunglasses as protection is no protection at all.  If anyone doesn’t get it, at least I have a hundred and five years before I get sued.

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