Michelangelo

Graham Cluley, of Sophos and Naked Security, posted some reminiscences of the Michelangelo virus.  It brought back some memories and he’s told the story well.

I hate to argue with Graham, but, first off, I have to note that the twentieth anniversary of Micelangelo is not tomorrow (March 6, 2012), but today, March 5.  That’s because 1992 was, as this year is, a leap year.  Yes, Michelangelo was timed to go off on March 6th every year, but, due to a shortcut in the code (and bugs in normal comptuer software), it neglected to factor in leap years.  Therefore, in 1992 many copies went off a day early, on March 5th.

March 5th, 1992, was a rather busy day for me.  I was attending a seminar, but kept getting called out to answer media enquiries.

And then there was the fact that, after all that work and information submitted to the media in advance, and creating copies of Michelangelo on a 3 1/2″ disk (it would normally only infect 5 1/4″s) so I could test it on a safe machine (and then having to recreate the disk when I accidentally triggered the virus), it wasn’t me who got my picture in the paper.  No, it was my baby brother, who a) didn’t believe in the virus, but b) finally, at literally the eleventh hour (11 pm on March 4th) decided to scan his own computer (with a scanner I had given to him), and, when he found he was infected, raised the alarm with his church, and scanned their computers as well.  (Must have been pretty close to midnight, and zero hour, by that time.)  That’s a nice human interest story so he got his picture in the paper.  (Not that I’m bitter, mind you.)

I don’t quite agree with Graham as to the infection rates.  I do know that, since this was the first time we (as the nascent antivirus community) managed to get the attention of the media in advance, there were a great many significant infections that were cleaned off in time, before the trigger date.  I recall notices of thousands of machines cleaned off in various institutions.  But, in a sense, we were victims of our own success.  Having got the word out in advance, by the trigger date most of the infections had been cleaned up.  So, yes, the media saw it as hype on our part.  And then there was the fact that a lot of people had no idea when they got hit.  I was told, by several people, “no, we didn’t get Michelangelo.  But, you know, it’s strange: our computer had a disk failure on that date …”  That was how Michelangelo appeared, when it triggered.

I note that one of the comments wished that we could find out who created the virus.  There is strong evidence that it was created in Taiwan.  And, in response to a posting that I did at the time, I received a message from someone, from Taiwan, who complained that it shouldn’t be called “Michelangelo,” since the real name was “Stoned 3.”  I’ve always felt that only the person who wrote that variant would have been that upset about the naming …

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