Blow your own horn

At a local conference, one presenter had a topic of “Blow Your Own Horn.”  The point was to be ready with some kind of success story (any kind of success story) ready for presentation.  Elevator pitch level stuff, except you aren’t selling anything specific, just success.

For example: “Last year you (the Board) approved purchase of a $50,000 licence fee for AV software on the email server.  This past month, records show it stopped 1 million viruses, which would otherwise have gotten through.  Had they been run, they would have cost $500 each (estimated industry average) to clean up.  Therefore, your prescient decision to spend $50,000 has returned $500,000,000 to the company.”

(OK, yes, any infosec professional knows the holes in that logic.  And you are turning it so that you are creditting the Board with what should be *your* success.  But you get the idea.)

I suggest everybody have a file in some readily accessible drawer, for scribbling down any idea you come up with along these lines, using company specific data.  One idea per page.  Any time you get called to the Boardroom (or, depending upon how many ideas you can come up with, any meeting) grab a sheet and read it in the elevator.  Whatever they asked you to talk about, walk in and start off with, “Thank you for your interest in X.  Before I begin, I’d like to let you know that, because of our investment in a $2,000 course in Ethereal, for one of the net sec admins, last April’s intrusion was detected within 5 hours, and we were able to ensure that all servers were hardened against that particular attack within only a further 12 hours, all within house.  Normally such an attack would be undetected for three days, and would have required outside help at a usual cost of $7,000.”

(Yes, this gets down into the weeds in regard to architecture, but security is a lot more about politics than technology.  And people love stories.)

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